Gatherings are with trust

Gatherings are with trust

We can see in all cultures that many may have a wrong impression. Here the writer of the article also believes that in the West it would be considered a given that anything said to other people would not be private by default. But normally we would consider everything said between people as something for their ears and normally private unless otherwise stated.

 

Normally we would consider a form of ethics that the person spoken to knows exactly what can be shared and what not.

 

A sitting with two or more people is in the West like it is in the East considered a meeting between four eyes and four ears, where privacy is the rule of the day and one does not expect the other being a clarion.

 

We do not know why this writer thinks we in the West do not have any rules of privacy nor dignity. But spreading such stories is doing no good to neither societies.

 

The writer should also know that as for them the exceptions to the rule would be gatherings (meetings) that are considered public by nature. But even for those bible classes are intern, and as such would also have things there being said which would not have to come to the general public.

He should know that like Islamic classes or halaqas where an open invitation is sent to the community, Western people also know it is better to only relate what is part of the scheduled talk and not things said as an aside, especially if they are personal.

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Al Amatullah

اَلْمَجَالِسُ بِالْأَمَانَة (رواه أبو داود)

Gatherings are with trust.

مجالس (majaalis) is the broken plural for مجلس (majlis) which comes from the root جلس (jalasa), meaning “to sit”. Basically, a majlis is any sort of a sitting with two or more people.

An أمَانَة (amaanah) is a trust, and it comes from the root امن (amuna) which means “to be faithful, reliable, trustworthy, to be safe, to feel safe”. Other words from this root include آمين (aameen, related to the English word amen), and مؤمن (mu’min) which means a believer.

In Islam, it is considered a given that anything said to other people is private by default. This is opposite to how much of the Western world operates, where all communications are considered to lack privacy unless people enter into an agreement of privacy – and…

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Where’s the Outrage Over Nun Beachwear? – The Daily Beast

Andrew L Griffith author of Multiculturalism in Canada: Evidence and Anecdote, providing an integrated view of how well multiculturalism is working, and Policy Arrogance or Innocent Bias: Resetting Citizenship and Multiculturalism, describing the relationship between the bureaucratic and political levels, regularly comments on citizenship, multiculturalism and related issues, in his blog, Multiculturalism Meanderings, as well in the media.

 

In addition to being posted to the Canadian Mission to the World Trade Organization, Geneva, where he was the lead negotiator for trade and environment and standards issues, Andrew has held trade assignments in Los Angeles, Iran, Saudi Arabia and Argentina.
Now living in Ottawa being married and having two adult children, he looks at Southern Europe, where the last word isn’t said yet about the burkini.

 

He remembers quit well that when you go to any public beach in Italy the chances are you’ll eventually see a woman wearing a veil and long skirt.

But she likely won’t be a Muslim in a version of the controversial burqini. She will almost certainly be a Catholic nun in her summer habit either watching children in her care or, God forbid, just enjoying some sun, which is considered a human right here in Italy, where the sea defines the majority of the borders.

No one in Italy would dare blink an eye at the sight of a habit-wearing sister at the seaside or even in the water

Though in France this may now be a total different matter, because enough people saw that those nuns were even more covered than their Muslim sisters. Therefore nuns’ habits are now also banned from some French beaches. The deputy mayor of Nice has confirmed the decision not only to ban any form of religious signs, like crosses, yarmulke a.o., as the furore over a ban on burkinis continues to rage.

 

Rudy Salles defended himself

“When you go to the beach you wear a bathing suit. You don’t go to the beach as you want. If I want to go on the beach naked it’s forbidden – I cannot,”

seemingly forgetting that the burkini is swimwear, so no objection should be made against such clothing where there are several fashionable suits as well.

 

The deputy mayor made it clear that

“If you want to go to the beach in a burkini it’s forbidden because it is a provocation. Religion and the state are completely separated. Religion is the affair of each one but each one at home, each one at church, not each one in the street.”

and as such

The same [ban would apply] for nuns.

 

These comments of the deputy mayor came after the many discussions around the burkini ban and after the secretary general of the Italian bishops’ conference criticised the ban.

 

Bishop Nunzio Galantino said in an interview with Corriere della Sera:

“It’s hard to imagine that a woman [in a burkini] who enters the water is there to carry out an attack.”

He added:

“I can only think of our nuns, and I think of our peasant grandmothers who still wear head coverings.”

and continued:

“The freedom to be granted to religious symbols should be considered on a par with the freedom to express one’s beliefs and to follow them in public life. And, let me tell you: I find it ironic that we are alarmed that a woman is overdressed while swimming in the sea!”

 

Our guestwriter from Canada remembers Marco Beoni, a barista at a coffee bar along the sea near Sabaudia, about an hour south of Rome, who told The Daily Beast

“We have nuns on the beach all the time. They go in the water in their skirts and sit on blankets just like everyone else. Who cares what they are wearing. What’s the problem?” 

 

France having a problem with covered skin of certain women gets herself more in trouble it looks like, and let us see her real face.

 

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To remember

  • French beach resorts banning women wearing the burqini (burkini) = modest full coverage swimwear
  • Socialist Prime Minister Manuel Valls waded into the debate = declaring wearing of burqini “not compatible with the values of France and the Republic.”
  • Angelino Alfano 2015.jpeg

    Angelino Alfano, leader of the Italian New Centre-Right party which is a split from the PdL

    Italy’s interior minister, Angelino Alfano, no great fan of immigration or integration of non-Italians into the country, said > France making a mistake by banning the burqini.

  • aim to avoid certain prohibitions interpreted as provocations => trigger retaliation towards Italy <= France banning interpreted religious wear on the beach

 

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Preceding articles

Being Religious and Spiritual 2 Religiosity and spiritual life

Connection between women and environmental sustainability

Poverty and conservative role patterns

Women their education and chances to become a parliamentary

French showing to the whole world their fear and weaknesses

Does Banning Face Veils Help Us Fight Terrorism?

Islamism Rises from Europe’s Secularism

You are what you wear

TUNISIA-ISLAM-LEISURE

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Additional reading

  1. Women’s Groups Say Gender Equality is a Must for Sustainable Development
  2. Gender connections
  3. Gender equality and women’s rights in the post-2015 agenda
  4. What is Racism??
  5. Is Europe going to become a dictatorial bastion
  6. On French beach French police forces woman to undress in public
  7. Women in France running with naked bosom all right but with covered bosom penalised
  8. France and the Burkini
  9. Not limiting others but sharing peace with all
  10. What we don’t say about the refugee crisis?
  11. A charter for a truly free world and why we need it
  12. When will it stop
  13. ‘I try to keep my hate in check. If you can’t hate, you can’t love.’

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Further of interest

  1. A Burqini is not Equivalent to a Burqa
  2. Nudism/Naturism and burkini madness: Why not ban all clothes at the beach?
  3. The scandal of women’s bodies in secular Europe
  4. Everyone everywhere wants to tell women what to wear
  5. Forcing a Muslim Woman To Undress is Not Fighting Oppression. That IS Oppression!
  6. Does Banning Face Veils Help Us Fight Terrorism?
  7. You may find this offensive The Burqini Ban
  8. Burkini and French Secularism
  9. Islam and the downfall of European culture
  10. Why the French burkini ban is damaging feminism
  11. At what point does a ban become a chance to publicly humiliate?
  12. the decomposition of logic and democratic values
  13. The Burkini Ban is good. Not to let your Country turn into Saudi Arabia – without Oil – in a couple of Decades, we must defend it. The right that our countries remain western.
  14. Another Attack on Western Civilization from Muslim Women
  15. Does France have a problem with racism?
  16. Burkinis in the land of Liberté, égalité, fraternité
  17. Burkini Ban : French Farce
  18. The Day The News Made My Blood Boil
  19. French burkini ban exposes the myth of neutral secularism
  20. Bretons bathe fully clothed as Muslim asked to leave beach
  21. French mayors dismiss suspended burqini ban
  22. United Nations Strongly Condemns French Authorities Decision to Ban Burkani
  23. What Not To Wear: A Short History Of Regulating Female Dress From Ancient Sparta To The Burkini
  24. You’ve Got to BurKining Me!
  25. To bare or not to bare

Multicultural Meanderings

Indeed:

Go to any public beach in Italy and chances are you’ll eventually see a woman wearing a veil and long skirt. But she likely won’t be a Muslim in a version of the controversial burqini. She will almost certainly be a Catholic nun in her summer habit either watching children in her care or, God forbid, just enjoying some sun, which is considered a human right here in Italy, where the sea defines the majority of the borders.  

No one in Italy would dare blink an eye at the sight of a habit-wearing sister at the seaside or even in the water

“We have nuns on the beach all the time,” Marco Beoni, a barista at a coffee bar along the sea near Sabaudia, about an hour south of Rome, told The Daily Beast. “They go in the water in their skirts and sit on…

View original post 328 more words

You are what you wear

Mostly it were men who tried to decide what a woman was allowed to wear or not. In the past clothing was restricted by the views of the macho male society, where women often came on the second plane. Today there are still societies where women are paid less for the same function or same job. Equality is in many countries still not there.

 

A lot of men also consider a woman not yet able to decide for herself and therefore want to impose laws telling what women may not wear because otherwise they could be dominated by their own husband or family. By imposing restricting laws do they themselves not want to have enough power over women, and let others belief that really woman are not able to decide for themselves what religion to chose and how devout they want to be?

In a civilised society that claims to want freedom for all, freedom for religious thought and religious development should be allowed. We should not try to impose our religious ideas or morals to others and certainly when they are trying to be more dignified than the majority of the population which want to play with morals or not to take it so serious.

 

In our so called democratic free state everybody should have a voice which will be encountered with respect. Liberty should be given to each person to go on a search for spiritual and religious values. And we should know and respect that not all are on the same level at the same time. We should allow each person to be on his/her own personal spiritual and life journey.

 

Who has the right to impose our own ideas of spirituality and morality on other women and still claim that we live in a free world?

 

Today we listen to a 22 year old South African Muslim woman, (Sabeehah M.) who spent about 12 years growing up in Europe, as well as an additional 3 years there, pursuing higher education and residing alone in a different country to my parents and a opinionated and ambitious woman (Shaazia E.) who perhaps like dismantling stereotypes about women who wear lipstick, look at the burkini affair in Europe.

Shaazia E. finds that women have always been judged by what they wear and that we can find several times men staring and whispering about women.  Concerning the Muslim and Western women she notes also that may people wonder of their upbringing and how their covering or non-covering says a lot about that upbringing or about their limitation brought on by religion or by others.

 

She also looks at what happened on the French beach

On Wednesday, the article circulating of three armed men forcing a woman to remove her clothes on a beach in France shocked people into a semblance of humanity (Well, most people anyway)

And said

Nobody should have to go through such humiliation and violation for the sake of their beliefs. But before we look at the French government with disdain, we need to understand that the amount of clothing a woman is wearing is not parallel to her morality.

 

Sabeehah M. noted

If you want to cover up for comfort at the beach, you might just be forced to undress by armed police. {Look Out, It’s the Fashion Police}

So you want to cover your legs at school… GASP, the audacity, you should be sent home! {Look Out, It’s the Fashion Police}

 

The ladies point at a danger coming to Europe as well, the same we condemn in the East, but created also here a Fashion Police or a Moral police who can come to you to humiliate you in front of the general public. Or like some police officers came to ‘help’ to undress a woman because it went not fast enough according to their liking, perhaps they can beat her up as well?

Perhaps you reject ‘Sharia’ dress code as an arbitrary concept. Careful, you could be next in line for a flogging. {Look Out, It’s the Fashion Police}

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We remember from their writing

  • uncovered, = immodest + lower standards of morality = odd assumption that women alone must behave modestly.
  • whether in the East, West or somewhere between > if you’re a Muslim woman, > no say in what you wear. {Look Out, It’s the Fashion Police}
  • woman’s modesty = subject dictated, controlled, judged, imposed by men, without including woman in the design, marginalising woman from the discussion, and without woman’s consent. {Look Out, It’s the Fashion Police}
  • way you dress = influence people to be immoral + manifestation of how you have wrong morals. {Look Out, It’s the Fashion Police}
  • we judge each other’s morals based on the amount of clothing we are wearing every day
  • women can never win.
  • in Islam women are supposed to act and dress modestly >>> But so should men
  • why is this expectation emphasised + even imposed on women alone?
    A man should be covered from his navel to his knees in accordance with Islamic codes of modesty.
    A woman should cover her hair and conceal her body shape, only revealing her hands, feet and face.
  • modesty = to be two-fold, both external + internal.
  • careful of double standards of modesty

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Preceding articles

Being Religious and Spiritual 2 Religiosity and spiritual life

Connection between women and environmental sustainability

Poverty and conservative role patterns

Women their education and chances to become a parliamentary

French showing to the whole world their fear and weaknesses

Does Banning Face Veils Help Us Fight Terrorism?

Islamism Rises from Europe’s Secularism

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Additional reading

  1. Women’s Groups Say Gender Equality is a Must for Sustainable Development
  2. Gender connections
  3. Gender equality and women’s rights in the post-2015 agenda
  4. What is Racism??
  5. Is Europe going to become a dictatorial bastion
  6. On French beach French police forces woman to undress in public
  7. Women in France running with naked bosom all right but with covered bosom penalised
  8. France and the Burkini
  9. Not limiting others but sharing peace with all
  10. What we don’t say about the refugee crisis?
  11. A charter for a truly free world and why we need it
  12. When will it stop
  13. ‘I try to keep my hate in check. If you can’t hate, you can’t love.’

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Further of interest

  1. Fomo, Jomo, Somo
  2. A Window to Look Through
  3. Would You Trust These People with Our Planet?
  4. Somewhere between the lines,we make a choice.
  5. The Morality of Firefly.
  6. Can You Be A Christian Doctor and Not Lose Your Morals
  7. Morality and Society: Why Secularists Do Not Need A Holy Text
  8. Why live a moral life?
  9. You Only Cheat Yourself
  10. Journey to Life
  11. “Progressives” Act as if Bigotry/ Racism are the Worst Sins —- No, It’s Pride
  12. Vladimir Putin: “One should not completely draw a line between the culture and the church.”
  13. The Good And The Bad
  14. Social, non-political, nudity observation
  15. Are Bathing Suits Harmful to Others?
  16. The Pastoral is Political: Don’t Tell Us How to Dress!
  17. Burkini a boon for Muslim women
  18. Bretons bathe fully clothed as Muslim asked to leave beach
  19. Here’s to your burqini
  20. French mayors dismiss suspended burqini ban
  21. The Burqini Ban
  22. British public heavily in favour of burqa ban: Poll
  23. To bare or not to bare
  24. Swimsuit Season : Burkinis and Man Boobs
  25. This letter to the editor has gone viral… #BanSuits
  26. Burkini Ban Suspended By French Court, But Sarkozy Says He’ll Keep The Law If Elected President.
  27. 9/11 Truth Movement celebrates Muslim women’s new French fashion style!
  28. Trying To Not Blog Politics
  29. Im-Politic: Immigration’s Essential – but Elusive – Assimilation Dimension
  30. What to Wear
  31. Wonder Woman’s Burkini
  32. What (not) to wear on a French beach this Summer
  33. Hugh Fitzgerald: Jean-Louis Harouel On France’s “Marche Vers Dhimmitude”
  34. Cannes burkini ban overturned after top French court ruling
  35. Burkini Bans: The Iconography of Attire
  36. Banal Ethnic Conflict and the Burkini
  37. Banning The Burkini
  38. Valls shouldn’t be surprised that there are whites who defend the burkini, ’cause it’s them who are bringing the muslims in.
  39. The Burkini is About Sexual Violence Against Women
  40. Let’s Do Secularism Right
  41. To wear or not to wear: the battle of the bikinis
  42. Belgian prime minister labels burkini ban as impractical
  43. Burkini and the Breast: Sisters in Feminism
  44. Can it Be Justified? The European Debate Over the Burka
  45. Le burkini: a national debate
  46. Burkini ban spikes sales
  47. Have I Been Hiding? No, Just Writing ElsewhereLe port du Burkini n’est pas anodin et c’est une marocaine qui le dit.
  48. Sous la plage les pavés

thesamoosarevolution

Women have always been judged by what they wear. In our society, the less clothing a woman wears the more she is considered immodest and indecent. A Muslim woman in shorts is a social pariah. Clusters of women or gatherings of men will stop and stare and whisper about her. She is looked at up and down. People wonder of her upbringing. People think because she is uncovered, she is immodest and has lower standards of morality. People have this odd assumption that women alone must behave modestly.

tumblr_mhos7etj9g1ro16hgo1_500

On Wednesday, the article circulating of three armed men forcing a woman to remove her clothes on a beach in France shocked people into a semblance of humanity (Well, most people anyway). I think what was the most striking was that the woman on the beach could have been us. It could have been me; it could have been you. It could have been…

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