Where’s the Outrage Over Nun Beachwear? – The Daily Beast

Andrew L Griffith author of Multiculturalism in Canada: Evidence and Anecdote, providing an integrated view of how well multiculturalism is working, and Policy Arrogance or Innocent Bias: Resetting Citizenship and Multiculturalism, describing the relationship between the bureaucratic and political levels, regularly comments on citizenship, multiculturalism and related issues, in his blog, Multiculturalism Meanderings, as well in the media.

 

In addition to being posted to the Canadian Mission to the World Trade Organization, Geneva, where he was the lead negotiator for trade and environment and standards issues, Andrew has held trade assignments in Los Angeles, Iran, Saudi Arabia and Argentina.
Now living in Ottawa being married and having two adult children, he looks at Southern Europe, where the last word isn’t said yet about the burkini.

 

He remembers quit well that when you go to any public beach in Italy the chances are you’ll eventually see a woman wearing a veil and long skirt.

But she likely won’t be a Muslim in a version of the controversial burqini. She will almost certainly be a Catholic nun in her summer habit either watching children in her care or, God forbid, just enjoying some sun, which is considered a human right here in Italy, where the sea defines the majority of the borders.

No one in Italy would dare blink an eye at the sight of a habit-wearing sister at the seaside or even in the water

Though in France this may now be a total different matter, because enough people saw that those nuns were even more covered than their Muslim sisters. Therefore nuns’ habits are now also banned from some French beaches. The deputy mayor of Nice has confirmed the decision not only to ban any form of religious signs, like crosses, yarmulke a.o., as the furore over a ban on burkinis continues to rage.

 

Rudy Salles defended himself

“When you go to the beach you wear a bathing suit. You don’t go to the beach as you want. If I want to go on the beach naked it’s forbidden – I cannot,”

seemingly forgetting that the burkini is swimwear, so no objection should be made against such clothing where there are several fashionable suits as well.

 

The deputy mayor made it clear that

“If you want to go to the beach in a burkini it’s forbidden because it is a provocation. Religion and the state are completely separated. Religion is the affair of each one but each one at home, each one at church, not each one in the street.”

and as such

The same [ban would apply] for nuns.

 

These comments of the deputy mayor came after the many discussions around the burkini ban and after the secretary general of the Italian bishops’ conference criticised the ban.

 

Bishop Nunzio Galantino said in an interview with Corriere della Sera:

“It’s hard to imagine that a woman [in a burkini] who enters the water is there to carry out an attack.”

He added:

“I can only think of our nuns, and I think of our peasant grandmothers who still wear head coverings.”

and continued:

“The freedom to be granted to religious symbols should be considered on a par with the freedom to express one’s beliefs and to follow them in public life. And, let me tell you: I find it ironic that we are alarmed that a woman is overdressed while swimming in the sea!”

 

Our guestwriter from Canada remembers Marco Beoni, a barista at a coffee bar along the sea near Sabaudia, about an hour south of Rome, who told The Daily Beast

“We have nuns on the beach all the time. They go in the water in their skirts and sit on blankets just like everyone else. Who cares what they are wearing. What’s the problem?” 

 

France having a problem with covered skin of certain women gets herself more in trouble it looks like, and let us see her real face.

 

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To remember

  • French beach resorts banning women wearing the burqini (burkini) = modest full coverage swimwear
  • Socialist Prime Minister Manuel Valls waded into the debate = declaring wearing of burqini “not compatible with the values of France and the Republic.”
  • Angelino Alfano 2015.jpeg

    Angelino Alfano, leader of the Italian New Centre-Right party which is a split from the PdL

    Italy’s interior minister, Angelino Alfano, no great fan of immigration or integration of non-Italians into the country, said > France making a mistake by banning the burqini.

  • aim to avoid certain prohibitions interpreted as provocations => trigger retaliation towards Italy <= France banning interpreted religious wear on the beach

 

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Preceding articles

Being Religious and Spiritual 2 Religiosity and spiritual life

Connection between women and environmental sustainability

Poverty and conservative role patterns

Women their education and chances to become a parliamentary

French showing to the whole world their fear and weaknesses

Does Banning Face Veils Help Us Fight Terrorism?

Islamism Rises from Europe’s Secularism

You are what you wear

TUNISIA-ISLAM-LEISURE

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Additional reading

  1. Women’s Groups Say Gender Equality is a Must for Sustainable Development
  2. Gender connections
  3. Gender equality and women’s rights in the post-2015 agenda
  4. What is Racism??
  5. Is Europe going to become a dictatorial bastion
  6. On French beach French police forces woman to undress in public
  7. Women in France running with naked bosom all right but with covered bosom penalised
  8. France and the Burkini
  9. Not limiting others but sharing peace with all
  10. What we don’t say about the refugee crisis?
  11. A charter for a truly free world and why we need it
  12. When will it stop
  13. ‘I try to keep my hate in check. If you can’t hate, you can’t love.’

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Further of interest

  1. A Burqini is not Equivalent to a Burqa
  2. Nudism/Naturism and burkini madness: Why not ban all clothes at the beach?
  3. The scandal of women’s bodies in secular Europe
  4. Everyone everywhere wants to tell women what to wear
  5. Forcing a Muslim Woman To Undress is Not Fighting Oppression. That IS Oppression!
  6. Does Banning Face Veils Help Us Fight Terrorism?
  7. You may find this offensive The Burqini Ban
  8. Burkini and French Secularism
  9. Islam and the downfall of European culture
  10. Why the French burkini ban is damaging feminism
  11. At what point does a ban become a chance to publicly humiliate?
  12. the decomposition of logic and democratic values
  13. The Burkini Ban is good. Not to let your Country turn into Saudi Arabia – without Oil – in a couple of Decades, we must defend it. The right that our countries remain western.
  14. Another Attack on Western Civilization from Muslim Women
  15. Does France have a problem with racism?
  16. Burkinis in the land of Liberté, égalité, fraternité
  17. Burkini Ban : French Farce
  18. The Day The News Made My Blood Boil
  19. French burkini ban exposes the myth of neutral secularism
  20. Bretons bathe fully clothed as Muslim asked to leave beach
  21. French mayors dismiss suspended burqini ban
  22. United Nations Strongly Condemns French Authorities Decision to Ban Burkani
  23. What Not To Wear: A Short History Of Regulating Female Dress From Ancient Sparta To The Burkini
  24. You’ve Got to BurKining Me!
  25. To bare or not to bare

Multicultural Meanderings

Indeed:

Go to any public beach in Italy and chances are you’ll eventually see a woman wearing a veil and long skirt. But she likely won’t be a Muslim in a version of the controversial burqini. She will almost certainly be a Catholic nun in her summer habit either watching children in her care or, God forbid, just enjoying some sun, which is considered a human right here in Italy, where the sea defines the majority of the borders.  

No one in Italy would dare blink an eye at the sight of a habit-wearing sister at the seaside or even in the water

“We have nuns on the beach all the time,” Marco Beoni, a barista at a coffee bar along the sea near Sabaudia, about an hour south of Rome, told The Daily Beast. “They go in the water in their skirts and sit on…

View original post 328 more words

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Islamism Rises from Europe’s Secularism

Liberal indignation at the sight of a Muslim woman in a swimsuit says far more about the fragile state of western secularism than it does the role of Islam in European societies.

Also the covering of the body does not have to be a typical Muslim phenomena. English celebrity chef Nigella Lawson in in 2011 choose to wear the fashionable long swimsuit with a head covering, which became better known as ‘the burkini” (burqini).

 

Proponents of clothing bans hail themselves as defenders of European civilisation and liberators of Muslim women from their patriarchal menfolk. they consider themselves to have the right to decide for those women whom according to them cannot decide for themselves which religion they would love to adhere and how they want to be dressed.

A covered woman, by this logic, is robbed of her agency – weak, oppressed and in need of the full armour of the state.

But those not allowing those women to wear what they would love to wear and to show or not show their body parts in one way or another are now deprived of their liberty to dress how they like and of their freedom to be religious in the way they want to be religious.

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To remember

 

  • France, Socialist government imposed a “secularism charter” = in every school, banning Christianity from educational system.
  • Municipalities changed enrollment form for schoolchildren eliminating words “father” and “mother”, = replacing them with “legal manager 1” and “legal manager 2”. => = George Orwell’s “Newspeak”.
  • “Day of Secularism” = celebrated every 9th of December.
  • October 2000, Nice, 105-member European Convention drafted Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union => only referred to the “cultural, religious and humanist inheritance of Europe”.

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Preceding articles:

French showing to the whole world their fear and weaknesses

Does Banning Face Veils Help Us Fight Terrorism?

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Additional reading

  1. Is Europe going to become a dictatorial bastion
  2. On French beach French police forces woman to undress in public
  3. Women in France running with naked bosom all right but with covered bosom penalised
  4. France and the Burkini
  5. Not limiting others but sharing peace with all

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Further reading

  1. The surprising Australian origin story of the ‘burkini’
  2. Burkini a boon for Muslim women
  3. France’s War on the Burqini
  4. French mayors dismiss suspended burqini ban
  5. The Burqini Ban
  6. My Burkini and I
  7. What does it mean to cover?
  8. Dear white people of France: being forced to undress wasn’t exactly the liberation I was longing for

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Let's condemn...

  • In France, the Socialist government imposed a “secularism charter” in every school, banning Christianity from the educational system. Municipalities have already changed the enrollment form for schoolchildren by eliminating the words “father” and “mother”, replacing them with “legal manager 1” and “legal manager 2”. It is George Orwell’s “Newspeak”.
  • After two major terror attacks in 2015, France, instead of promoting a cultural “jihad” based on Western values, responded to Islamic fundamentalism with a ridiculous “Day of Secularism” to be celebrated every 9th of December.
  • This narrow secularism has also prevented France from openly supporting Eastern Christians under Islamist oppression.
  • The empty 13th century Oude Kerk church in Amsterdam is now used for exhibitions and can be rented for gala dinners. In front of it there is “Sexyland”, offering “Live F*ck Shows”, a coffee shop for drugs and an “Erotic Supermarket” for dildos. For seven euros one can also visit…

View original post 121 more words

Does Banning Face Veils Help Us Fight Terrorism?

It is totally wrong to generalise and to say that

Muslims who have been living in Europe for decades refuse to be integrated and remain fairly isolated within their religious and ethnic communities.”

Many Muslims have a proper job and talk about the same general matters as other believers and go to the same super and hypermarkets like other civilians in that country.

It is also wrong to suppose women cannot make up their own mind and would not be able to choose their own religion and would not be able to decide themselves how they want to cloth themselves. Like atheist, Christian or Protestant women can choose themselves what they want to believe and to which religion or denomination they want to adhere, Muslim women also can be smart enough to decide themselves to which denomination in the Islamic religion they want to be apart of and in which way they want to follow the rules of that denomination.

The burkini, also known as a halal swimsuit, modestly covers all but the face, hands and feet, consisting of a top and a bottom. It resembles a wet suit with a head covering.

It has become popular with pious Muslim women, those women (like British cooking celebrity Nigella Lawson) who wear it to avoid a tan, and pious Jews have adopted a variant garment.

Lots of people do forget with a burkini the face is not covered and the clothing clearly shows the women contours and no weapons can be hidden under that clothing whilst under a male’s loose t-shirt a bomb-belt can be worn as well under the coats of people on the street weapons can be carried.

On television we saw a man saying the burkini had to be banned because weapons could be hidden, but he himself was wearing a loose T-shirt where much more could be hidden than by that Muslim woman. So normally he also should have been asked to undress.

When the French are afraid women would hide weapons under their burkini than they also should have going to forbid males and females to be dressed with covering clothes on the streets and in the shops in Summer time and Wintertime.
Can you imagine it: all having to run on European streets in a bikini or monokini whilst it is freezing cold?

The burkini poses no danger to public security. Unlike the burqa or niqab, it leaves the face uncovered. Relatively tight-fitting, it leaves no place to hide weapons.

If a woman wishes to dress modestly on the beach, that is her business, and not the state’s.

The Islamist threat to the West is very real, recognises Daniel Pipes the president of the Middle East Forum, who writes

Issues concerning Islam are arguably Europe’s No. 1 concern, ahead even of the European Union and the financial crisis. They need to be dealt with by confronting real problems, not by focusing on symbolic irrelevancies such as burkinis, halal shops and minarets. Burqas and niqabs must be banned (as the German government may soon do); freedom of speech about Islam and Muslims must be reconfirmed, Saudi and Iranian funding for religious purposes must be cut and a single legal code must apply to all.

The French better concentrate onto the real issue and should demand their state to take care of all citizens, whatever belief they may have, that they can live in a free country not having to fear Islamic or other fundamentalist terrorists and let Muslims and others wear what they wish to the beach.

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Preceding article: French showing to the whole world their fear and weaknesses

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Additional reading

  1. Is Europe going to become a dictatorial bastion
  2. On French beach French police forces woman to undress in public
  3. Women in France running with naked bosom all right but with covered bosom penalised
  4. France and the Burkini
  5. Not limiting others but sharing peace with all

+++

Further reading

  1. Burkini
  2. The Burkini
  3. From Bikini To Burkini, Or Why Lebanon’s Tripoli Is Awesome
  4. You may find this offensive 
  5. Burkini Ban: Not Everything has to be Legislated On, You Dimwits
  6. Just Say “Non” to Burkini Bathing Beauties?
  7. Post Burkini law, France needs to reform
  8. The Burkini: Muslim women and swimming
  9. Haiku, Dress Code
  10. Much Ado About Nothing: Thoughts on the ‘BurkiniGate’ (EN)
  11. Why I am against the Burkini Ban in France –
  12. Ban the Burqa, Allow the Burkini
  13. You are what you wear
  14. This Burkini on the beach business is making me feel uneasy. 
  15. Binding divides
  16. An end to the burkini hullabaloo?
  17. Stop. Trying. To. Strip. Me.
  18. Fashion and the re-inscription of Muslim identity – a female only space
  19. Deciding what to wear in another culture
  20. Why do you care what we wear?
  21. Ce Saint Que Je Ne Saurais Voir: Réflexions sur le «BurkiniGate» (FR)

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French showing to the whole world their fear and weakness

Terrorist beginnings

The previous year France and Belgium had to face very serious attacks to the integrity of their nation.

In the mid-1980s Belgium had already an experience of terrorist actions. Primarily engaged in bombings within Belgium’s borders the CCC or Cellules Communistes Combattantes (Communist Combatant Cells) attacked perceived enemies of communism, specifically NATO, US and other international businesses and the Federation of Belgian Enterprises. Today many may have forgotten those Cellules Communistes Combattantes their attacks which led to several injuries and only two deaths, whilst the Bende van Nijvel or Nivelles Gang, also known as the Brabant killers managed to kill 28 people and got 40 seriously injured between 1982 and 1985, but are also left in the past.

This present day also after the bombings at the airport and metro of Brussels, and the several terrorist attacks by Islamic terrorists all over the country, made the Belgium a little bit more alert They had tears for the victims (Christians, atheists, but also Muslims) but also very sensitive to continue to live on, not giving in to the Islamic terrorists, fearing everything about Muslims.

Taken by fear and covering clothes

The French seem to be taken so much by fear they start panicking as soon as they see a Muslim man or Muslim woman. Even worse, when they notice a Muslim woman in covering clothes or in a swimsuit they get in a terrible state and start using bad words and doing abusive degrading, humiliating actions. Do they really think such devout person, covering her body parts, would be a threat for their life?

Several majors of French cities and several politicians tried to limit the way women can chose their dress. On Thursday, the council of state, France’s highest administrative court, and judicial and advisory body, examined a request by the French Human Rights League to scrap the burkini bans which were imposed and caused already several disturbing  and very embarrassing terrible humiliating situations.

burkini-nice.jpg

Women in France facing fines and humiliation for wearing burkinis (Photo AFP/Getty)

Beachwear ban and infringement on basic freedom

The bans – made in the form of mayoral decrees – followed the Bastille Day attack in Nice and the murder of a priest in Normandy. Though they do not explicitly use the word burkini but instead ban

beachwear which ostentatiously displays religious affiliation”,

citing reasons such as the need to protect public order, hygiene or French laws on secularism, many women wearing too much covering clothes were reprimanded and those with a burkini were forced to take it off and to pay a fine.

At a hearing before the state council on Thursday, lawyers for the rights groups in the Villeneuve-Loubet case argued that the bans were feeding fear and infringe on basic freedom.

Lawyers argued that the short-term decrees are illegal and had good reason to declare such bans to be against human rights of liberty, in a state which had liberty in its ensing, having Liberty, Equality and Fraternity as their three core values.

Burkini ban

burqiniThe film-temple Cannes was the one to start all the fuss and gave the kick-off for banning the burkini because it

“could risk disrupting public order while France was the target of terrorist attacks”

by which you may wonder how such covering up of the body, still showing it is a woman in the dress, would disrupt public order. When the way of dress would create others to react negatively, the state should react on those who take on a racist attitude and not on the one who wears ordinary clothes. The second reason of imposing the restriction should ring strange bells in our ears: It is said those town imposed this law because burkinis ‘are’

“not respectful of [the] good morals and secularism

of France. Where we do have to question which those good morals are, when you see all that body exploitation, commercial nudity, fornication, a.o.. Against the secularisation we can understand, noticing that the state wants to exclude any from of religion, Judaism, real Christianity, though not objecting the pagan Roman Catholic Church because those Catholics do not do much with their religion and for those few priests and nuns who are in such minority, why should the state bother, because most people do not take them serious.

In France though most would oppose when a nun was forced to take off her habit on a beach, though lots of French people did find it right to have Muslim women to be forced to take off their (often even less covering) clothes. We even got to see where some police officers ‘helped’ to take off the clothes of a woman who was not quick enough according to their liking. It was really degrading to see such a humiliation in public in a so called Western civilised society.

Sexual objectification

In that French society suddenly fashion designers when designing nice clothes for Muslim women are called to help the people to set up against the governement and against public order.
France’s women’s rights minister, Laurence Rossignol, accused the designers of high-fashion burqinis and hajib headscarve of encouraging the “imprisonment of women’s bodies.” Would she also accuse the high fashion places of France to encourage the Caucasian men to consider women as a sex object and lookism target or making women attractive to be the treasure of man and as such imprison them in Western capitalist society? Why suddenly fashion for Muslim women becomes ‘Sexual objectification‘ when it is not for Caucasian non-religious and Catholic people?

The objectification of women, is an important idea in feminist theory and psychological theories derived from feminism and feminist shall have a new task in coming up for the rights of Muslim women, who are now clearly deprived of their own free choice to cloth them selves in a way they find appropriate according to their faith.

Fear for God searching and  finding people

Mainly males protesting of the covered ladies bodies should have us wonder if those men do not have an other problem. And if they seriously think persons wearing such clothes could impose a danger to the community, they should come to give a better explanation. Lots of them are afraid of islamisation of their country and think that when more people show their devoutness more French people would be put to shame and shall come to consider to change their secular life and perhaps consider to come to look for God again.  For many this is clearly also a problem. Many are very much afraid that people shall start wondering about their faith and about the Truth. Many are really fearing that several people may come to know God better and come to see how the Catholic Church mislead them so much.

Forcing women to go for protection

By forcing the Muslim women to cloth in a different way than they want to do for their faith, the French push them in a corner and shall make certain groups stronger, because they shall support those women and help them. In this way we have already the Algerian businessman and political activist Rachid Nekkaz who previously  founded the organisation “Touche pas à ma constitution” (English: “Don’t touch my constitution”, a play on the slogan of the NGO SOS Racisme: Touche pas à mon pote), which pledged to pay the fine of any women convicted of wearing the burqa in public, now also has created a fund to pay for any fines incurred by women wearing burkinis, and has already helped several women by paying their €38 fine.

But also radical preachers shall get to pull the women to their site, showing how pervert modern society has become, and how much the State does everything to get people away from God. The latest measures forbidding to wear any religious symbol on public adds to the proof of the willing secularisation of the State.

At the same time the governement in France does everything to create more hate between its population and in Allah or God believing people.

Nekkaz called the burqini ban

“symptomatic of the French government’s efforts to eliminate Islam, bit by bit, from the constitution”,

adding that the French government

“wishes to battle against the visibility of Islam in France”. {Meet the man paying off burqini fines in France}

But believers in God should see the Nation wants to go even a step further. Clearly this week they have taken the step to make it very clear that they are prepared to start the battle against the visibility of any God loving group of people, being it Jews, Christians or Muslims.

Public suppression and rejection of religion

La Sophia Lara, who is currently a student reading Latin and Italian at University in Scotland, whilst she is a linguist at heart, her interests and passions also expand to ‘philosophical’ contemplations (used in the slightest of terms), travelling and making YouTube videos on her channel, reacts rightly on her blog

A France which prides itself for liberté, égalité, fraternité, has unfortunately fallen short in recent times, with more social division and socialprejudice arising within the country, due to the public suppression and rejection of religion; the consequent of which has led to violent eruptions. It is also precisely through the social persecution of the wider islamic community in such acts which aim to strip them of their beliefs, that it seems that the French government are validating individuals’ fears, rather than attempting to diffuse them. I personally believe that the government has made very little effort to try to remedy the severance, and have instead trumped the terrorist acts  as a way to divert the attention away from their own failed model of harmony. {France’s banning of the ‘Burqini’ is the rejection of its founding principles}

Suppression of dissent

In France we may notice that because of the fear for terrorist attacks and because of the fear of the unknown (the lack of knowledge of what really Islam is and should be) suppression of dissent has come to demand its place in that nation of liberty and so called freedom.

The non believers in a god or the God form the group which is more powerful than those who believe in the Almighty Divine Creator of heaven and earth, has taken advantage of the present situation to directly censor, persecute and oppress those believers in the God of gods (Allah).

Lots of French do not want to give an ear to the other victims of the terrorist attacks and do not want to know more about Islam and how certain groups are misusing that religion its name to create war and anger. They do not want to take time to consider all facts and to engage with and constructively respond to or accommodate the other party’s arguments or viewpoint.

Sticker art arguing that dissent is necessary for democracy.

For many French people, Muslims are now considered a dissent perceived as a threat, against whom action must be taken, and should be repressed plus considered as “dissidents” to get rid off.

In several blogs we could find such reactions blaming ‘all Muslims’ for the agony which came over France.

Those who do not want to believe a woman can decide herself to wear a burkini deny the right of that woman to decide for herself

In France there are lots of people who do not seem to believe a Muslim woman can be strong enough to decide for herself to wear what she wants. There are even some people, like a Dutch blogger, who want to believe because a female wants to cover her body she is giving a sign that when it would not be covered she is allowed to be raped and should be found guilty of doing so. That is turning it all the way around (wrongly). By not allowing those women to dress as they want, the state gives the signal that it does matter how people are dressed and how female beings give a signal to men if they are ready to be taken as wife or be subject to be used as something else.

Any woman should have the own right to decide what she wants to wear without any man giving a connotation to what she wears.

So called nothing to do with racism but for safety reasons

When the burkini ban has nothing to do with racism and anti Islam religion do we not to question

How can a piece of clothing be a threat?
How can Burkini decrease the level of security?
How can they decide what women should wear to the Beach?
How is this even a topic of discussion?! {Burkini a threat…}

Is the Moroccon, Tetouan, Swedish Sarah not right in posing

they think by forcing us to dress a certain way they are helping us… They are the ones oppressing muslim women by taking away their rights do be who they want to be and dress how they want to dress. {Burkini a threat…}

Why should any person who does not want to walk naked have not the right to cover her body up? Be her or him a Jew, Christian, Muslim, atheist or a pagan believer, who may have the right to decide what she or he has to wear?

The Swedish blogger writes

I’m so tired of the “what should muslim women wear” discussion. If my sisters don’t want to be half naked while swiming, they shouldn’t be forced. If my sisters want to cover up, they should be able to. And if my sisters want to be free, let them be free.

Stop trying to set us free from a decision we freely made!!
Stop trying to label us.
You do you, and we are going to do us and just keep being awesome.🙂{Burkini a threat…}

Exclusive Madonna Holiday in France

Madonna, France has a message for you: You can’t swim with us. #youcantsitwithus – Exclusive Madonna Holiday in France

21st century witch hunt

Texan Cartoonist Clay Jones wrote

Western Europe is proving we’re not alone in the United States with our racism, xenophobia, and mass stupidity. I’m still recovering from the hate rally I attended last week.

Human Rights groups asked France’s highest court to strike down the ban, and they agreed. The court ruled that the ban

“seriously, and clearly illegally, breached the fundamental freedoms to come and go, the freedom of beliefs and individual freedom.”

I’ll add to that with “yeah.”

and drew a very good cartoon, which you can find on his site: Claytoonz: burkini.

Maryana Kovalchuk hits the nail on the dot to think of a new witch hunt. She writes

An affront to women. A sign of intolerance towards cultural diversity and integration. A step to prejudice, discrimination, segregation and an insult to everyone who worked hard against them. {Universal concern: not naked enough}

and ads the very confronting nice picture.

the-rapture-1999-shirin-neshat-1397865366_org

Caption from film ‘Rapture’, 1999, Shirin Neshat

We only can hope the French will find a solution to avoid further Islamic terrorist attacks and shall not try any more to take away the attention of the French public, from the real problem France does not seem to be able to manage.

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Please continue  reading:

Does Banning Face Veils Help Us Fight Terrorism?

Islamism Rises from Europe’s Secularism

+

Preceding articles

A world with or without religion

Women their education and chances to become a parliamentary

++

Find also to read

  1. 2014 Religion
  2. Social media a destabilisation tool in the Middle East and Syrian conflict
  3. 2015 the year of ISIS
  4. Summary for the year 2015 #1 Threat and fear
  5. Wrong ideas about religious terrorism
  6. A world in denial
  7. Man’s own fault and the choice to flee from fear
  8. Being Charlie 11
  9. Tears for Belgium
  10. Mountains of information, disinformation and breaking away
  11. Funding of ISIS
  12. Paris attacks darkning the world
  13. Brussels-born Salah Abdeslam key suspect Paris terrorist attacks
  14. The Meaning of Paris
  15. Children of Men
  16. Before you blame All Muslims for the terrorist attack in Paris
  17. Humanity Quote for Pax Populi
  18. When will it stop
  19. French Muslims under attack
  20. Syrian but also Belgian connection to French attacks
  21. A sleeper cell of militants was said directing attackers sent back to France from Islamic State’s de-facto capital in Raqqa, Syria
  22. Massive police operation in northern Paris suburb of Saint-Denis
  23. Mediterranean bloodshed
  24. Nice attack, terror everywhere and coup attempt in Turkey
  25. France and the Burkini
  26. On French beach French police forces woman to undress in public
  27. Women in France running with naked bosom all right but with covered bosom penalised
  28. For those Christians who say they are the Victim
  29. A Secular Mindset
  30. Is Europe going to become a dictatorial bastion
  31. About burkinis and where burka’s are banned > Full burqa and niqab ban

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Additional reading

  1. A Secular Mindset
  2. Social media, sympathy & shocks
  3. Blinded crying blue murder having being made afraid by a bugaboo
  4. For those Christians who say they are the Victim
  5. Signs of the Last Days
  6. God Watches
  7. Not limiting others but sharing peace with all
  8. A Jew and Muslim walking together side by side down USA city streets
  9. A darker and stranger place
  10. Il terrorismo è l’urlo di un bambino al buio
  11. Remain lovingly = No path for softies
  12. You Matter
  13. How to Find the Meaning of Life and Reach a State of Peace

+++

Further of interest

  1. Egalité and Fraternité are great, but we need to ask ourselves some very difficult questions about Liberté
  2. Pope on Charlie Hebdo: There are limits to freedom of expression when faith is insulted
  3. Terror Is A French Word
  4. Timeline of European terror attacks
  5. Some thoughts on the Paris attacks
  6. France Makes Major Shift Toward Fascism in Wake of Paris Terror Attacks
  7. The Brussels Attacks: A Paris Perspective
  8. Reaction from U.S.A. President Barack Obama
  9. Brussels, Europe’s jihadist breeding ground, now itself under attack
  10. Misunderstandings of Islam: Violence and Riots Break Out in Molenbeek
  11. A Culture Comes Together From Paris Attacks
  12. Terror attack in Nice!!!
  13. France Attack: More Than 84 Dead As Truck Filled With Bombs Crash Into Crowd.
  14. A Celebration ended with terror
  15. Nice truck attack leaves France and the world in shock
  16. Why we should try to understand violence
  17. Explaining Terrorism
  18. Hypocrisy Abounds: Free Speech as Cover for Islamophobia
  19. Nice Terror- “Keep Eiffel Tower Dark until ISIS conquers France”
  20. Updated: Muqtada al-Sadr wears military uniform: Some thoughts on the secularisation of Muqtada al-Sadr
  21. A2 Sociology: American devotion to religion is waning, according to new study
  22. A2 Secularisation
  23. A2 Beliefs: UK one of world’s least religious countries, survey finds
  24. A2: Faith, hope and secularity: Ireland on brink of change as church power wanes
  25. Studies in Church History 52: the Church and doubt
  26. Religion: A Diminishing Prospect?
  27. Secularisation 1
  28. Secularisation 2
  29. 5 Feature Ideas on Religion
  30. How God left the Netherlands – or is it the other way around?
  31. The War on Nothing
  32. Are All Lives Equal?
  33. Anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant rallies grow in Europe
  34. Morality, values and Developing right choices
  35. Why Gender Equality Is Not Just About Equal Rights
  36. Gender Equality and Equality
  37. A dying Western culture is the problem
  38. Islamism Rises from Europe’s Secularism
  39. Modest Swimwear: The Burkini
  40. East Essence: Shop Islamic Clothes For Your Whole Family!
  41. Ban The Burka
  42. Planned ‘Burqini Day’ irks French far-rights
  43. The Burkini Ban and the French Secularist Hypocrisy
  44. Third French burqini ban after Corsica clashes
  45. France’s banning of the ‘Burqini’ is the rejection of its founding principles.
  46. Burkini and French Secularism
  47. French Web Round-Up: 5 Things That Made Me Smarter This Week
  48. Thoughts on Burqini
  49. Breaking News: France requesting to Saudi Arabia’s ‘Morality Police’ for training their police force!
  50. Dear white people of France: being forced to undress wasn’t exactly the liberation I was longing for
  51. France’s War on the Burqini
  52. What women need is security
  53. What does it mean to cover?
  54. Islam, France, Burkini: A chit chat on FB
  55. My Burkini and I
  56. France’s highest court suspends burkini ban in test case
  57. The Burqini Ban
  58. Burkini Ban: How an Innocent Pun Became Another Way to Erase Muslim Women
  59. Anti-burkini decrees
  60. French mayors dismiss suspended burqini ban
  61. Amid Burkini Controversy, European Right-Wing Suggests Restricting Islamic Faith.
  62. Meet the man paying off burqini fines in France
  63. More prejudices than burkini ban
  64. The Big Deal About the Burkini
  65. Australian designed Burkini taking the world by storm.(Haute couture)
  66. French resorts defiant as top court suspends burkini ban | The Times of Israel
  67. French mayors uphold burkini ban to keep beaches ‘sexy, not terroristy’
  68. Burkini = Look for the very good cartoon
  69. an other cartoon: Battle of the Burkini
  70. The Thing with the Burkini…
  71. Women’s Freedom to Choose
  72. Planned ‘Burqini Day’ irks French far-rights
  73. Dear white people of France: being forced to undress wasn’t exactly the liberation I was longing for
  74. France’s highest court suspends burkini ban in test case
  75. France’s Top Administrative Court Overturns Burkini Ban
  76. A Good Court Thing
  77. Politicians still playing games after #BurkinBan was deemed ‘definitely illegal’
  78. Meet the man paying off burqini fines in France
  79. French mayors dismiss suspended burqini ban
  80. Dear France
  81. Who Wins the War on Terror? Love wins.
  82. Love. Above all.
    1. 99 Word Blog (#024) Banned Burkinis
    2. Current Events Corner 8/16/2016
    3. “France is at War with its own Citizens” – Yasser Louati on the Cannes “Burkini” Ban
    4. Uproar in France over ‘burkini ban’ at Cannes beaches
    5. #62 French police force Muslim woman to remove her Burkini on Nice beach (photos)
    6. Undress for safety
    7. Nudism/Naturism and burkini madness: Why not ban all clothes at the beach?
    8. Does Banning Face Veils Help Us Fight Terrorism?
    9. Why are the burqa and burkini being banned?
    10. Fashion vs the Government: The Burkini Debate
    11. The scandal of women’s bodies in secular Europe
    12. French burkini ban exposes the myth of neutral secularism
    13. Burkini and French Secularism
    14. Ban of burkini: theresult ofmalechauvinism or secularism
    15. France’s Burkini Ban: Identity politics go to the beach
    16. Forcing a Muslim Woman To Undress is Not Fighting Oppression. That IS Oppression!
    17. Banning The Burqa And Burkini Is Not The Correct Liberal Response To Conservative Islam
    18. The Hypocrisy of the Burkini Ban
    19. A Burqini is not Equivalent to a Burqa
    20. Corsican town becomes third in France to ban the burkini after #Islamics riot
    21. France’s Burkini BigotryBurkinis in the land of Liberté, égalité, fraternité
    22. To Burkini Or Not To Burkini: The Ages Of Men Deciding What Women Should Wear
    23. French Burkini Bans Face Legal Challenge as Tension Mounts
    24. France has for its name, the contrary of Liberty and Fraternity practice.
    25. A cover story
    26. Does France have a problem with racism?
    27. Everyone everywhere wants to tell women what to wear
    28. The Day The News Made My Blood Boil
    29. Beachwear bull
    30. Women protest French burkini ban outside French Embassy in London
    31. Show us your bits..
    32. It’s Always the Cover Up
    33. Thoughts of the Day: Burkini Ban
    34. Doing something for something’s sake is a dangerous strategy
    35. Burkini Ban : French Farce
    36. Burkini beach
    37. Facebook 45 – Suorkini
    38. The burqa-One mermaid’s opinion
    39. burkinis or bikinis?
    40. Burkini vs Bikini
    41. The Burkini
    42. Burquini – How It Happened
    43. Burkini Ban: Nice
    44. Cannes Ban
    45. Why the Burkini ban poses a threat to Muslims and Non-Muslims alike
    46. #Burkiniban – the problem is veiled ideology
    47. 24 August 2016 – All Lives Matter (or Overly Clad Women)
    48. Why the French burkini ban is damaging feminism
    49. Dear French PM, The Burkini Ban Is Abhorrent
    50. Burkini being a threat
    51. The Burkini ban
    52. Liberty, Equality, Bigotry?
    53. From Bloomers to Burkinis: The Same Old Story? by Sarah Ansari
    54. Modern feminism makes no sense at all
    55. Jean-Luc Mélenchon on the Burkini : “C’est une provocation”.
    56. And the Debate about Burkini Ban continues #burkiniban
    57. Can’t we just put all the cards on the table?
    58. The folly of the #Burkiniban
    59. Bitches, Puhleeeeze….
    60. Ban the Burkini.
    61. The Burkini Ban
    62. Everything under the sun
    63. Very simple solution RE: Olympics and Burkini
    64. Next time I go to swim I might wear a good burkini
    65. Saudi Arabia Bans Stripy Fisherman Shirts and Berets
    66. Another Attack on Western Civilization from Muslim Women
    67. The Burkini Ban Is Pointless And Racist
    68. The Burkini Ban is good. Not to let your Country turn into Saudi Arabia – without Oil – in a couple of Decades, we must defend it. The right that our countries remain western.
    69. So! (en) | Islamic veil across Europe
    70. Pope urged to wear swimming trunks
    71. Where’s the Outrage Over Nun Beachwear? – The Daily Beast
    72. the decomposition of logic and democratic values
    73. Freedom of choice. It’s not so simple.
    74. Europe has been awash with racial tension this summer
    75. France’s ‘burkini ban’, one step too far?
    76. In hiding
    77. #BurkiniBan
    78. France has ‘misunderstood’ burkini, Australian designer says
    79. “Burkini” Ban Accomplishes Nothing Positive
    80. The Hijab and MeIslamophobia or nah?Islam and the downfall of European culture
    81. The Islamisation of my Country – 1
    82. So let me get this straight…
    83. At what point does a ban become a chance to publicly humiliate?
    84. New Feminism – via Unapologetics
    85. Ban the Burqa, Allow the Burkini :: Middle East Forum
    86. If you ever had any doubt that Bill O’Reilly of FOX News wasn’t actually a Muslim-sympathizing liberal, this will remove it
    87. Quebec opposition MNAs reopen divisive debate over religious attire with call for ban on burkinis
    88. Salafist fuckin’ la revanche
    89. The best tweets showing the absurdity of the #BurkiniBan on French beaches
    90. Australian burkini designer profits from French ban
    91. Burkini, Bikini. Potato, potarto.
    92. New Feminism
    93. “Burkini”ban in Quebec: Samer Majzoub interview on CJAD by Aaron Rand.
    94. Why an Italian atheist should thank France for the burkini affair
    95. Kini Miney Mot
    96. More French towns spread ban on the burkini
    97. How Western is the Bikini?
    98. Twitter 48 – Burkini
    99. Twitter 49 – Hollande
    100. Twitter 50 – Tormentone
    101. Twitter 51 – Maledette femmine disinvolte
    102. Costume Drama
    103. Patrick Weil : « Qu’on laisse en paix les femmes voilées » | L’Opinion
    104. Port du burkini: un débat futile, selon Trudeau
    105. Parlons… du “burkini”
    106. Quand le maillot faisait polémique
    107. Quasi quasi mi metto un burkini
    108. Le burkini, c’est sexy
    109. Message de Coluche pas sage : “Le burkini sur la plage – Y’a quelqu’un qui pourrait expliquer aux Musulmans dits modérés du Sud que Carnaval, ça se fête une seule fois dans l’année civile en France, le Mardi Gras ? Sinon j’m’ramène une plume au Q sur la plage et j’fais carnaval tous les jours comme eux, moi aussi !” !
    110. Das Burka-Getümmel
    111. Femminismo, Burkini e dichiarazioni delle donne CL – Alle radici del sessismo, o della cazzata mediatica del mese di agosto 2016
    112. Filosofia dell’anima e femminismo – Burkini
    113. La discussione sul burkini in spiaggia è una stronzata apocalittica.
    114. Io, donna ebrea, sto dalla parte del burkini. A una condizione
    115. Di burkini e di diritti
    116. Vamos à la playa
    117. Κάννες: 10 μουσουλμάνες μπήκαν με μπουρκίνι στη θάλασσα, παρά την απαγόρευση
    118. Γιατί οι Κάννες απαγόρευσαν το μαγιό-burka;
  83. Fatwa 131471, Burkinis und die Welt

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A world with or without religion

Last week Europe was shaken like the world got a shock in 2001.

European newspapers could fill their pages with the recent and potential terrorist attacks in France. Analysts, experts, and commentators take time and space to discuss and debate the facts, often with skewed and confused perspectives on Islam, and offer a variety of political and emotional responses.

Since the Wednesday January 7 terrorist attacks on the satirical magazine, there has been not only a sharp increase in anti-Muslim attacks in France, but in many countries, again lots of people are saying that it would be better not having any religion and than we would have more peace. Those claiming it would be better without religions do seem to forget it is not the religions which brings the fighting under people. In case there was no religion and in case people had no faith in certain higher values than life provides at the moment, it even could be that there would be more fighting going on in the world.

Would people seriously think that there would not have any terrorist attacks against the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo or against the Jewish supermarket in Paris, when it would not have been Jewish but would have been part of a certain political group or certain chain?

Eurobarometer Poll 2005 Percentage of those wh...

Eurobarometer Poll 2005 Percentage of those who agreed to the statement that “there isn’t any sort of God, spirit, or life force”. Colour enhanced from the original: contrast -0.5; gamma 0.7. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When you take away religion you still have people who can think differently over certain matters. Atheism would not guarantee that they all would agree with each other. Having no religion shall not take away the differences in political thinking and shall still give, and perhaps even more, reason to disagree and react heavenly to other political parties. Have a look at how many different political opinions and how many different political parties there are in the world.

Interior Ministries would have much more work with different opposing groups, who would not mind to try to get rid of the others, no matter at what cost, because they would know a human life having no value when it is done with.So, by taking care of other opinions they shall be happy to be the only ruler and would not fear anything but the strongest human being, and therefore shall try to do everything to become the strongest themselves.

Now with ethics still playing a role and with people led by their faith to organise their life, people shall feel restricted in what they are allowed to do or in what can be done. With not ethics their shall be no boundaries.  For those who think when people do not belief in The God or any gods, the world would be safe of fightings, I would like to tell them that atheism in a certain way is also a religion and when it can not be considered like that it is at least also a faith.

In atheism there are also many thoughts, like there are many denominations in Christendom or in any other religion.

When there would not exist religion people would, as they did, find it out. It is true there would not be Islamophobia or Judaism fear, but still homophobia, racism would still exist. Even having no gods around people would create themselves high persons and idols, like they still do today. Even people who do not believe in God or gods call their idol ‘god’. Just look at the titles they give in the world of sport and how many gods can not be found under the footballers, tennis players and boxers.

Please also do not forget that ‘god’ is a tittle, meaning a higher person or being an important person. In the Bible we do find several called god. Angels are called god in the Holy Scriptures, but also Pharaoh, Moses, Apollo, Zeus and others. Some even think because Thomas at one point says “my god” think he is taking Jesus as his god and as God. Those readers do not see or hear the “and” before “my god” and do not understand Thomas is speaking to one person about that one person and about an other person, the God of Jesus, the God of Abraham, Who is the God of gods.

In this world when there would be no religion we also would see various god-men around the world, with whatever title the people then would give them or whatever word may be used in their language to denote such a figure. Everywhere in the world of religious and non-religious people we can find human beings who seem to be having this delusion that they have special powers or abilities that promote them to a pedestal that is higher than that of us mere mortals.

thinks that’s what makes them excel in their line of business. He also thinks it is good to have faith in a guide/teacher/guru and have a direction in life. I also believe it is very important that children have a good example they can look up at and follow. Teachers or educators or leaders in a youth or adult movement have helped many a men realize their potential (in movies, mythology, and real life).

Throughout the ages the world has seen many inspirational teachers, gurus, masters of with, inspirational thinkers, who stimulated others to think for themselves and to make a real quest in life.

Every age has got its master or people where others looked at or wanted to follow. Jeshua, the Nazarene (also called the Christ) was also such a man who got a lot of followers though others did not like that at all. Mahatma Gandhi and Luther King also were preachers of peace who did not want to create a new religion, like Jesus did not want to do that.

India has always been a very fruitful region for spiritual leaders. Also in this century a new special guru has found attention.

Gurmeet Ram Rahim Insan, as he calls himself (you can’t miss the mass appeal there) happens to be this socio-religious (and I think political as well) leader in India that has a huge following. His ‘fans’ claim that he is a do gooder who is trying to rid youth of the nation from the evil clutches of drugs. He carries out blood donation drives, and his many followers unquestioningly tread on the path illuminated by him. Why should anybody have a problem with such a man who is working for the society? {The God Complex & An Exercise in Absurdity}

This man who is born Gregory House frequently referred to overt acts of philanthropy and generosity as underlying symptoms of a disease.

In his vitriolic style, he mocked people for having the “God Complex”, while it can be debated that he had one too. {The God Complex & An Exercise in Absurdity}…

But then, he decides to make a movie and star in it as a (super)hero. The promotional trailers of MSG-Messenger of God are on the telly and some people like me who are on a highway to hell by India’s religious standards are having a good laugh. His fans have come out all guns  blazing on various social media platforms, silencing the detractors and rooting for their babaji. They counter the arguments by asking questions that are only beaten in absurdity by the movie itself. {The God Complex & An Exercise in Absurdity}

We also love to live a moving picture show, loving to see a better world for us than we can find in this real world. Have a look at Facebook, and you will understand what I mean. There you can find a beautiful example how people present themselves differently than they really are. Also there they love to show others how they can interact and build themselves an empire of friends and activities wherewith they can show off.

Those supporting the movie (most of whom are followers of the baba) innocently question that when other movies can show miraculous escapes and stunt scenes, why can’t Gurmeet Ram Rahim’s movie show him performing miracles?

Second. more important question is that when other movies get away with questioning religion in the name of ‘freedom of expression’, shouldn’t the makers of MSG be allowed to have their freedom too?

The last few days it was all about that freedom in Europe. Having received a big slap in the face we had to cry out loud our anguish at our hurt community. In which way were we to be pushed or to be allowed to go? Where is it that we want to go with our society and ow do want propaganda, brainwashing, infiltration allow our lives to direct?

After the Great War, lots of people thought never such a cruelty would come over them again, but soon World War II was on their doorstep. After that calamity the West soon recovered and thought it was now safe. But on September 11, 2001 the dream of the Western World was demolished by the crash of three air-planes. The material world of successful accomplishments could experience the deadliest attack ever launched on American soil, leaving them asking again:

Why did God permit such a thing to happen?

and

How can human beings be capable of such diabolical savagery in the name of religion?

2015 January 11 in remembrance of 2001 September 11 again an Islamic terrorist act on symbols of the Western society and its freedom - Attack on Charlie Hebdo mazazine in Paris, France

2015 January 7 in remembrance of 2001 September 11 again an Islamic terrorist act on symbols of the Western society and its freedom – Attack on Charlie Hebdo magazine in Paris, France

On Wednesday January 7, 2015 it was again of the same sort. Once more the West was attacked, fired in the middle of their weak heart.  Again there were people who said it was done in the name of their god, though in the Abrahamic religions there is no such God who would agree with such violence. Others said it was the fault of the religions, but they seem to forget in case there were no religions there still would be other groups fighting each other.

Lots of people do accept opposition from one or the other side but not from certain other sides. But also to be questioned is how much and in which way do we want to accept opposition.

In case there where no religions and no people believing in The God, a god or gods, they would have favouritisms for certain civic believes or political ideas.

Already from the beginning of mankind people sought ways to live with others and to form communities. Therefore different systems where thought of. The different opinions how to make the best of life would also trigger differences to have people arguing and even coming to fight with each other. Economical and political factors would be there to have people coming against each other and even being prepared to kill others for it. History can proof that.

To say therefore that religions are the cause of such misery is doing injustice to those religious people. Most of them look for ways to come at peace with each other in respect of certain values which they consider very important for making a good working human society. They mostly have ethics which they want to give priority to material or personal gain.

What we see from those who claim to be fighting for Allah is that they mostly do not follow the Words of that Allah and even do not mind killing other followers of that God. Boko Haram and ISIS are very good examples of that letting the world see that they are not afraid to rape and kill children, women and men, who also believe in their God. those jihadists also have no scruples to bomb mosques, temples of worship for Allah, and to burn Holy Scriptures like the Quran.

Those people who terrorise others misuse religion to bring more reason to frighten others for what they are doing. The jihad-fighters want people to believe that the Quran justifies their actions. Others do want to believe them and do want to believe others

Islam’s “victorious-with-terror” prophet (Hadith, Bukhari 2977) commands Muslims to mimic his example (Qur’an Sura 33:21) by ruthlessly pursuing non-Muslims (Sura 4:104, 48:29) to “terrorize” them (Sura 3:151, 8:12, 8:57-60), to “siege and slay them” (Sura 4:89, 33:57-61), to “murder” and to maim (Sura 5:33; Hadith, Tabari 9:69) in order that they be “subdued” and “destroyed” by Allah at the hands of Muslims for the cause of Islam (Sura 2:244, 4:76, 8:39, 9:14, 29-30, 9:38-39, 9:111, 61:10-12). Yet when the light of truth is shone upon the horror that is Islam the willingly ignorant still choose to remain in the dark, for to expose pure evil is to expose a monster they’d rather not see … {The Ghost Of Charlie Hebdo And The Purple Beret}

Many do not want to show true respect for those who believe in certain values and in certain elements which are above our human intellect, like spiritual beings and The God of gods.

Pope Francis I, who has urged Muslim leaders in particular to speak out against Islamic extremism, went a step further when asked by a French journalist about whether there were limits when freedom of expression meets freedom of religion. The leader of the Roman Catholics insisted that it was an “aberration” to kill in the name of God and said religion can never be used to justify violence.
But he said there was a limit to free speech when it concerned offending someone’s religious beliefs.

“There are so many people who speak badly about religions or other religions, who make fun of them, who make a game out of the religions of others,”

he said.

Religious or not, we all should see what happens in the context, of how human beings act. We should see that even without religions we would have agitators and “provocateurs”. They often are not interested in ethics and what a majority wants. They want to push their believes and their wants on others. They just want to have power over the rest of the world.

In the wake of the Paris attacks, the Vatican has sought to downplay reports that it is a potential target for Islamic extremists, saying it is being vigilant but has received no specific threat. Francis I said he was concerned primarily for the faithful, and said he had spoken to Vatican security officials who are taking “prudent and secure measures.”

In many countries it is the unbalance of one group opposite the other that creates problems. In France for example we can see that 5 million Muslims account for 10 to 12 percent of the country’s total population (the largest Muslim population in Europe) and Jews (478,000) are outnumbered by its Muslims 10 to 1. The extreme right party National Front receiving 4,712,461 votes in the 2014 European Parliament election, finishing first with 24.86% of the vote and 24 of France’s 74 seats, should give a clear sign of the danger that could come up to France even when those Jews would not be religious Jews and the Muslims would not exist but still be from foreign origin. The Algerians, Moroccans a.o. North Africans and Turkish people would face the same danger as now with their own religions.

Reburied in Har HaMenuchot cemetery in Jerusalem the Jewish cell phone salesman Ilan Halimi got a garden named after him in Paris where he was kidnapped on 21 January 2006 by a group called the Gang of Barbarians and subsequently tortured, over a period of three weeks, resulting in his death.

Without religions we also would have headlines about the hatred between people and could find articles about unspeakable murders like the one of the French Jewish man of Moroccan descent Ilan Halimi in 2006 which heralded a sharp turn back to Europe’s most notorious hatred, at the hands of its newest population. More than 1,000 people marched through the streets of Paris, demanding justice for Halimi, on Sunday February 26, 2006. Initially buried in the Cimetière parisien de Pantin near Paris his funeral in Paris drew a large Jewish crowd. It could not stop the violence against Judaic people. There have been thousands of attacks on French Jews and Jewish sites in the years since Halimi was killed.

We should know that not only

nationalism is a foundational aspect of French life. Old nationalist allegiances have made it hard for well-meaning Muslim immigrants to integrate into society, as they have no direct ties to Metropolitan France. They live largely among themselves in banlieues, whose customs and norms closely resemble those of the inhabitants’ countries of origin—not those of their new home. {The Existential Necessity of Zionism After Paris: a commentary Editorial}

America’s premier monthly magazine of opinion and a pivotal voice in American intellectual life “Commentary” does see the problem of our European community. Also when there would be no religions we would have people from all sorts of places in the world gathered in our regions. After the second world war we had great dreams of a united world. In the postwar age we needed workforce to build up the country again and invited people from other continents to work for us. The doctrine of multiculturalism, the idée fixe of postwar Europe, has not only a strange relationship with French nationalism:

Though it would seem nationalism’s ideological opposite, multiculturalism offers rosy-cheeked cover to France’s deep unwillingness to allow anyone without centuries-old roots to become “French.” Nominally, according to the postmodern ideal of multiculturalism, no one culture is more virtuous than another.

And so the anti-Western, anti-Semitic Islamism practiced by France’s most dangerous citizens is not to be vilified, but rather understood and, ultimately, tolerated. As a matter of daily reality, however, multiculturalism allows the French to keep the Muslims separate—and unequal. And it allows some in France to entertain the belief that Jews, too, can never be French. {The Existential Necessity of Zionism After Paris: a commentary Editorial}

Several may wonder now what France and its neighbour countries are going to do now they seem to be caught between the deadly reality of radical Islam and the potential manifestation of a neo-fascist revival. In case there would have been no religion there was still the matter of all those ‘foreigners’ and all those ‘coloured’ living in Europe, the same as in America you could find immigrants and coloured people.

In Europe we notice that there has come a certain pressure on many, who have seen in the economical crisis and the political evolution a similar situation as in the 1930s. Therefore many religious as well as non-treligious Jews have chosen to go to their promised Holy Land. Last year, a record-high 7,000 French Jews immigrated to the Jewish state — more than double the year before. The Jewish Agency, which oversees immigration of Jews to Israel, now estimates that some 15,000 French Jews will make aliyah in 2015.

In case there would have been no thought or no idea of a god or gods and no religions, people would have invented something to classify the different groups and ideas between the many different folks. Those classification would be there like we already classify the continents with different names and can find in each of them a multitude of political parties, which have nothing to do with religion. We can see between those political parties there are also battles going on the same as their is competition between economical forces.

With or without God, people would find enough time, arguments, money and weaponry to make their differences hard.

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You may also find to read:

  1. About what happened in France: , Being Charlie 2, Being Charlie 3, Being Charlie 4, Being Charlie 5, Being Charlie 6, Being Charlie 7, Being Charlie 8, Being Charlie 9, Being Charlie 10, It’s beautiful to watch the spread of #JeSuisCharlie across the world, Where do we stand in the backdrop of Charlie Hebdo Massacre ?, Charlie Hebdo, offensive satire and why ‘Freedom of Speech’ needs more discussion
  2. 2013 Lifestyle, religiously and spiritualy
  3. Religious Practices around the world
  4. Are you religious, spiritual, or do you belong to a religion, having a faith or interfaith
  5. Faith because of the questions
  6. Looking to the East and the West for Truth
  7. Science, belief, denial and visibility 1
  8. Science and God’s existence
  9. Exceptionalism and Restricting Laws
  10. Economic crisis danger for the rise of political extremism
  11. Zionism comments and the place of Jerusalem in the world
  12. Anti-Semitism ‘on the rise’ in Europe
  13. Immigration consternation
  14. Green Claims in Europe
  15. Arson attack carried out on Stevenage Central Mosque
  16. Religion, fundamentalism and murder
  17. Christian fundamentalism as dangerous as Muslim fundamentalism
  18. Muslim Grooming (Rape) Gangs and Sharia
  19. ISIS, Mosul Dam and threatening lives of those who want to live in freedom
  20. Condemning QSIS or the self-claimed Islamic state ruler, al- Baghdadi their extremist ideologies and to clarify the true teachings of Islam
  21. Europe and much-vaunted bastions of multiculturalism becoming No God Zones
  22. Subcutaneous power for humanity 5 Loneliness, Virtual and real friends
  23. Do we have to be an anarchist to react
  24. Apartheid or Apartness #1 Suppression and Apartness
  25. Occupy South African Embassies
  26. Self-development, self-control, meditation, beliefs and spirituality
  27. Morality, values and Developing right choices
  28. Classes of people and Cronyism
  29. Economics and Degradation
  30. How do you define religion?
  31. Atheists, deists, and sleepers
  32. Where is the edge
  33. Materialism, would be life, and aspirations
  34. Misleading world, stress, technique, superficiality, past, future and positivism
  35. Why Think There Is a God? (3): Why Is It Wrong?
  36. Christian values and voting not just a game
  37. Sharing a common security and a common set of values
  38. Not true or True Catholicism and True Islam
  39. Leaving the Old World to find better pastures
  40. Migrants to the West #1
  41. Migrants to the West #2
  42. Migrants to the West #3
  43. Migrants to the West #5
  44. Migrants to the West #6
  45. Migrants to the West #8 Welbeing
  46. Migrants to the West #10 Religious freedom
  47. Economic crisis danger for the rise of political extremism
  48. Quran versus older Holy Writings of Divine Creator
  49. Quran can convert to Christianity
  50. Liberal and evangelical Christians
  51. With Positive Attitude
  52. Stand Up
  53. Helping against or causing more homophobia
  54. Reflect on how much idolizing happens
  55. Martin Luther King’s Dream Today

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Additional reading

  1. Pope on Charlie Hebdo: There are limits to freedom of expression when faith is insulted
  2. Krauthammer: Obama: Charlie who?
  3. Of tweets, twits and the factually deficient
  4. Pope Says He’d Punch Someone Who Insulted His Mother
  5. Invention of religion

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  • What the Charlie Hebdo terrorists have won so far (bangordailynews.com)
    Although French police have hunted down and killed the suspects in Wednesday’s Charlie Hebdo attack, the terrorists have, on at least two levels, already won: They’ve scared a number of powerful news organizations into submission, and they’ve stoked European Islamophobia, whose rise will help militant Islamists recruit more supporters.
  • Anti-Islam Rallies Growing in Germany (guardianlv.com)
    After the attack on the Charlie Hebdo newspaper offices in France last week, anti-Islam rallies in Germany are seen to be growing rapidly. The rallies are being held by a group known as Pegida, which means in English: Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamization of the Occident.Pegida is a right wing organization in Germany that is holding protests in various cities to fight against the growing influence of Islam in the everyday life of the country. The organization claims that the influence of Islam is slowly destroying the European culture. They also are against certain immigration practices, asylum seekers, and they want the “protection of Judeo-Christian culture” for the Western world.Although the protests in Germany have been taking place for some time, the number of attendees has been rather small in the past. On October 20 of last year, the first rally only had about 350 people present. At a meeting on January 5, there were 18,000 protestors there. Once the killings at the Charlie Hebdo newspaper offices had taken place, the number of participants has grown greatly.
  • Hypocrisy Abounds: Free Speech as Cover for Islamophobia (truthdig.com)
    A magazine that most people outside France had never heard of before Jan. 7 now has legions of followers and fans around the world. The dominant narrative that has emerged from the horrific massacre of 10 staffers of Charlie Hebdo (plus police officers and hostages) is that the very foundation of freedom itself was attacked last week in Paris, and that the best way to fight Islamic fundamentalism is to uphold the ethos of Charlie Hebdo’s irreverence and satire. After all, in seeing their own values embodied in Charlie Hebdo, holders of “Je Suis Charlie” signsseem to be positioning themselves on the “right” side of freedom and democracy.
  • Anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant rallies grow in Europe (thestar.com)

    A grassroots anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant movement is continuing to move across Europe in wake of the terror attacks that hit Paris last week.

    A crowd of nearly 25,000 attended an anti-Muslim rally in Dresden on Monday. For the last several months, the German group Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamization of the West, or PEGIDA, has been holding the demonstrations, calling for stricter controls on asylum rules and tighter immigration policies.

    Germany, along with northern European countries, is experiencing massive influxes of migrants from conflict zones in the Middle East and North Africa. Vast numbers of Syrians, Afghans, Iraqis and others caught up in war, persecution and poverty are all trying to settle in wealthier European countries to begin new lives.

  • A dying Western culture is the problem (thecommentator.com)
    The German Chancellor Angela Merkel said: “We need to say that right-wing extremism and anti-Semitism should not be allowed any place in our society.” That was the German Chancellor’s response to Pegida, the burgeoning movement in Germany against what its supporters see as the relentless Islamisation of Europe.Ms Merkel’s comment was a politician’s slur. The problem for Angela Merkel is that it’s not Pegida that is anti-Semitic, but large numbers of Europe’s Muslims. This is a truth that the EU political establishment refuses to acknowledge, even when its own bureaucrats produce the hard evidence.For example, a 2003 European Union study on anti-Semitism found that Europe’s anti-Semites were not the usual stereotypical suspects (white, skin-headed Nazis), but Muslim gangs. The report was suppressed — Europe’s PC politicians did not like the findings — and only became public when details were leaked to the Jerusalem Post.But who needs a study to show who the anti-Semites are? You can hear it and see it on Europe’s streets.
  • ‘Charlie Hebdo’: why jihad came to Paris (irishtimes.com)
    Nearly 1,300 years have passed since Charles Martel turned back the Islamic invasion at Tours, and there was a historic resonance to the policeman’s words.
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    Amid the blur of stained glass, incense and candles inside the cathedral, Fr Emmanuel Da alluded to the atrocity. “Whatever his religion, whatever his culture, a human being is your brother, and violence is a prison,” he preached. “Harming one brother with homicidal violence is harming God. There is no act more repugnant to God than homicide.”
  • Charlie Hebdo Attack Could Induce Spread Of Anti-Muslim Sentiments In Europe (eurasiareview.com)
    Elmas stated that Turkey stands as one of the most exemplary countries in terms of showing that Islam can coexist with the values of democracy, rule of law, etc. Here, Elmas underlined that Turkey should continue to cooperate with the EU and that the two parties would greatly benefit from identifying and acting upon the lowest common denominator between them when it comes to the issue.
  • European Powers Implement Police State Measures in Wake of Charlie Hebdo Attack (gunnyg.wordpress.com)
    Governments throughout Europe have responded to the attacks on Charlie Hebdo in France by moving quickly to push through a raft of anti-democratic measures. They are exploiting the shock and confusion generated by the event in Paris to take actions… European Powers Implement Police State Measures in Wake of Charlie Hebdo Attack
  • Timeline of European terror attacks (seattletimes.com)
    A gun assault on the Paris offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo Wednesday was the deadliest terrorist attack in France’s recent history. Some other terror attacks in Western Europe:

Anti-Semitism ‘on the rise’ in Europe

For some years now in Belgium we see a bad evolution, similar as the trend was evolving in the 1930s Berlin.

Media creating an idea of danger

Once a world full of entertainment and “joy de vivre”, without financial restriction the people loved to have their freedom, going out until late in the morning.  Being drunk they passed others, but found themselves, by their anti-social behaviour more looked at. This annoyed them. with the financial crisis they also saw that they could not any more enjoy their going out “a volonté” and could not have so many trips to other countries any more. Aannoying as well was that some cheaper regions became more dangerous because of Muslim Fundamentalists. Those also came more in the news and tried to get more Belgians involved in their ‘road to Damascus’. Sharia for Belgium took care that the Muslim community came in a worse picture, and the media did the rest to present all those Muslims as a danger for our community.

The banks corrupting and the financial market bringing down the people with the little savings while the Jews still kept the thriving market of jewellery. Seeing those sometimes ‘poorly’ black dressed Jews was a sneer in the face of those who envied their money.

Antisemitism is one of the most alarming examples of how prejudice can endure, lingering on for centuries, curbing Jewish people’s chances to enjoy their legally guaranteed rights to human dignity, freedom of thought, conscience and religion or non-discrimination. Despite European Union (EU) and Member States’ best efforts, many Jews across the EU continue to face insults, discrimination, harassment and physical violence that may keep them from living
their lives openly as Jews. Nevertheless, there is little concrete information available on the extent and nature of antisemitism that Jewish people encounter in the EU today – whether at work, in public places, at school or in the media – information critical to policy makers seeking to craft effective solutions to bring an end to such discrimination.

Nazi Anti-Semitic propaganda at Yad Vashem

Nazi Anti-Semitic propaganda at Yad Vashem (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Data by European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights

The European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) has reported on the available official and unofficial data on antisemitic incidents in its Annual report on Fundamental rights: challenges and achievements, as well as in a separate annual working paper – Antisemitism: Summary overview of the situation in the EU – which presents trends on the available data covering up to 10 years. This provides a long-term view of the developments concerning
antisemitic incidents. These reports are part of FRA’s body of work on hate crime, shining light on the experiences of various groups such as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) persons, immigrants and ethnic minorities, and persons with disabilities.

The available data fail to answer many questions, however, which are of keen interest to policy makers looking to improve responses to antisemitic acts. Effective solutions require information on the types of antisemitic incidents, the context in which they take place and the reasons why many incidents are not reported at all, indeed, why official statistics markedly underestimate the number of antisemitic incidents and the number of people exposed to these acts.
Furthermore, even the most basic official statistics on antisemitic incidents are not available in many EU Member States.

Need for rallying against something

For some it might be clear that people need something to rally against to stay united. A good example of that we could see in the ‘Cold War’ where we had the West against the East, the Americans against the Soviets. Many do think it was the best time when they had the USA to rally against the USSR. Several Americans do find they have come to sit in a slow-motion train wreck of a divisive, culturally degenerative society ever since the Soviet Union ceased to give them purpose and unity.

Others consider that certain people are looking for it by placing themselves as a separate people. They are convinced that the Jewish religion encourages a separate identity for Jews, asking them to keep themselves apart in certain respects from the cultures they live within. That naturally can lead to conflict. People hate certain Christians for much the same reason. Those who want to follow the Only One God undergo the difficulty of ‘not being of this world’ and still having ‘to be part of this world’. Non-trinitarians are as ridiculed and confounded as the Jews who have the same God of Abraham. (Check in your own environment how people do think for example of Jehovah Witnesses.)

Blamed for suffering

It's not a question of religion, the Jew is of...

It’s not a question of religion, the Jew is of a different race and the enemy of ours. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Historically, Jews have had religious traditions and doctrines that have allowed them to thrive (or at least survive) where others have struggled. Because those people did follow the Laws of the Divine Creator somehow they also where protected and blessed by this Creator God. They also seemed to cope better with their struggle for life and their suffering, which was a thorn in the flesh for the people around them who underwent more difficulties with the same problems.

During the Black Plague, Jews washed themselves more often than once a year, which reduced their infection rate; they were blamed.
Due to Christian bans on usury, they were inevitably the money lenders; they were blamed.

Having been able to cope with many diseases, many terrible incidents, every-time springing up again, like not destroyable weed, always forming one union with their community, combined with being members of a highly visible minority where race and religion are not equal but intermingled, is sufficient to trigger envy by others who also look at the actions taken in Israel where walls are build and Palestinians provoked.

2012 Survey

5,847 self-identified Jewish people (aged 16 years or over) in eight EU Member States – Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Sweden and the
United Kingdom gave their answers for the survey which was carried out online during September and October 2012.

Two thirds of the survey respondents (66 %) consider antisemitism to be a problem across the eight EU Member States surveyed, while on average three quarters of the respondents (76 %) also believe that the situation has become more acute and that antisemitism has increased in the country where they live over the past five years. In the 12 months following the survey, close to half of the respondents (46 %) worry about being verbally insulted or harassed in a public place because they are Jewish, and one third (33 %) worry about being physically attacked in the country where they live because they are Jewish. Furthermore, 66 % of parents or grandparents of school-aged children worry that their children could be subjected to antisemitic verbal insults or harassment at school or en route, and 52 % worry that they would be physically attacked with an antisemitic motive while at school or en route. In the past 12 months, over half of all survey respondents (57 %) heard or saw someone claim that the Holocaust was a myth or that it has been exaggerated.

Protecting Jewish people from discrimination

About one quarter of respondents (23 %) said that they have felt discriminated against on the grounds of their religion or ethnic background in the 12 months preceding the survey. Specifically concerning discrimination because of being Jewish, the respondents in all eight EU Member States indicate that they are most likely to experience discrimination at the workplace (11 % of respondents who were working during the period have experienced this), when looking for work (10 % of respondents who have been looking for work) or on the part of people working in the education sector (8 % of respondents in school or training or whose children were in school or training have felt discriminated against by people working in this area). More than three quarters (82 %) of those who said that they have felt discriminated against during the period because they are Jewish did not report the most serious incident, namely the one that most affected them, to any authority or organisation.

Antisemitism on the internet

Antisemitism on the internet – including, for example, antisemitic comments made in discussion forums and on social networking sites – is a significant concern for a majority of respondents. Overall, 75 % of respondents consider antisemitism online to be a problem, while another 73 % believe antisemitism online has increased over the last five years.
More than 80 % of the respondents living in Belgium, France, Hungary and Italy are concerned by the level of antisemitism on the internet which they say has increased either a lot or a little. Antisemitic hostility in public places and antisemitism in the media are the next two manifestations that respondents are most likely to perceive as on the rise.

Meeting the needs of Jewish victims of hate crime

Antisemitism in Budapest Gyermekavasut

Antisemitism in Budapest Gyermekavasut (Photo credit: Yigal Chamish)

One quarter of respondents (26 %) experienced some form of antisemitic harassment in the 12 months preceding the survey – including various offensive and threatening acts, for example, receiving written anti-semitic messages, phone calls, being followed or receiving offensive antisemitic comments in person or on the internet, according to the survey results. Overall, 4 % of respondents experienced physical violence or threats of violence because they are Jewish in the 12 months preceding the survey. Of all respondents, 3 % on average said that their personal property has been deliberately vandalised, because they are Jewish, in the 12 months preceding the survey. A majority of the victims of anti-semitic harassment (76 %), physical violence or threats (64 %), or vandalism of personal property (53 %) did not report the most serious incident, namely the one that most affected the respondent, in the past five years to the police or to any other organisation protecting Jewish people from discrimination The relative position of antisemitism on the list of other social and political issues varies slightly among the EU Member States surveyed. When asked to consider whether each of the items presented is a problem or not in the country where they live, the respondents rated unemployment (85 % saying that it was ‘a very big’ or ‘a fairly big problem’), state of the economy (78 %) and racism (72 %) ahead of antisemitism (66 %) in terms of the present magnitude of the problem. Anti-semitism was followed as a problem, respondents said, by crime levels (62 %), immigration (59 %), religious intolerance (54 %), state of health services (51 %) and government corruption (40 %). In contrast with other countries, in Germany antisemitism was regarded as the greatest problem (61 %) in comparison to the other issues listed in the survey, such as unemployment (59 %), racism (57 %) or others.

Respondents from all the EU Member States surveyed except of Germany – consider unemployment to be the most pressing issue facing the country where they live.
Over 90 % of respondents in five countries (France, Hungary, Italy, Latvia and the United Kingdom) saw the state of the economy as ‘a very big’ or ‘a fairly big problem’. Respondents in Germany and Sweden seem less concerned with the state of the economy – 41 % and 25 % of the respondents, respectively, said it is ‘a very big’ or ‘a fairly big problem’.

Most pressing social and political issues

Antisemitism was rated among the three most pressing social and political issues in France, Germany and Sweden (85 %, 61 % and 60 %, respectively, considered it ‘a very big’ or ‘a fairly big problem’). In a pattern that differs slightly from the other survey countries, respondents in Belgium viewed – besides unemployment – crime levels and immigration as the problems which most affect the country where they live (81 % and 80 %, respectively).

Respondents in Hungary and Italy alone considered government corruption to be among the top three problems in the country where they live (94 % of respondents voiced this opinion in both countries). A notable share of respondents in Latvia and the United Kingdom identified the state of health services as a problem (92 % and 69 % of respondents, respectively).

Respondents were also asked whether they felt that antisemitism has increased or decreased during the past five years in the country where they live. Antisemitism is reported to be on the increase – having increased ‘a lot’ or increased ‘a little’ – by a majority of respondents in all eight EU Member States surveyed . The percentage of respondents indicating that antisemitism has increased over the past five years was especially high (about 90 %) in Belgium, France and Hungary. These are also the countries, as shown earlier, where the respondents were most likely to say that antisemitism is ‘a very
big’ or ‘a fairly big problem’ today.

Manifestations and Attacks to affect community

Antisemitic attacks have a profound impact not only on the individuals concerned and those close to them, but certain manifestations of antisemitism also affect the Jewish community as a whole.

Among the specific manifestations listed, online antisemitism is seen as a particular problem: three quarters of all respondents (75 %) consider this either ‘a very big’ or a ‘fairly big problem’, and almost as many (73 %) believe that it hasincreased over the past five year.

59 % of the respondents feel that antisemitism in the media is ‘a very big’ or ‘a fairly big problem’, while 54 % say the same about expressions of hostility towards Jews in the street and other public places. Half (50 %) consider desecration of cemeteries to be a problem.

The majority of the respondents in France (84 %), Belgium (74 %) and Hungary (72 %) consider expressions of hostility towards Jews in the street and other public spaces to be ‘a very big’ or ‘a fairly big problem’ in the country. In Sweden (51 %) and Germany (48 %), about half the respondents consider it a problem, while in Italy (30 %) or the United Kingdom (35 %) one third of the respondents do so.

Arena’s

Regarding the four arenas where antisemitic comments may occur and comparing the eight survey countries, respondents from Belgium, France and Hungary indicate in particular antisemitic reporting in the media (64 %, 70 %, and 71 %, respectively, to be ‘a very big problem’ or ‘a fairly big problem’) and antisemitic comments in discussions people have (69 %, 72 %, and 76 %, respectively). Respondents in France and Hungary (87 % each) highlight political speeches and discussions. Respondents in Latvia were less likely than those in the other countries surveyed to highlight any of the four arenas as very or fairly problematic with regard to spreading antisemitic content. In Sweden and the United Kingdom, less than half of all respondents consider that  antisemitic content is ‘a very big’ or ‘a fairly big problem’ in three of the four arenas, with the exception of antisemitism on the internet, for which respondents living in those two countries also give a higher rating, seeing it as a problem.

Prevalence and context of negative statements about Jews

Hearing or seeing statements that offend human dignity by assigning fictional negative attributes to individuals as members of a group can be detrimental to Jewish people’s sense of safety and security and undermine their ability to live their lives openly as Jews. The FRA survey addresses this issue by asking respondents to what extent they have been exposed to certain statements selected for the survey, and whether they consider these statements antisemitic. The statements selected cover various issues including the role of the Jewish community in society, their interests and distinctiveness, attitudes towards historical experiences and current issues. These statements do not necessarily reflect the whole spectrum of antisemitic views or connotations. They were used to guide the respondent into thinking about situations where they may have heard negative comments about Jewish people, in order to identify the contexts in which Jewish people hear these comments and to describe the person or persons who made the comments.
Respondents’ assessments concerning these statements offer an insight into the issues which they consider antisemitic. Respondents’ sensitivity to all things (perceived as) antisemitic has an impact on all of the other survey results.
First, the survey respondents were asked how often they have heard or seen non-Jewish people make these statements, in what contexts they have heard or seen them, and respondents’ perceptions concerning those who made these statements. The information concerning the medium used for making these statements and the context in which they are made can help the EU and its Member States in designing measures to counteract the use of such statements, for example, through awareness-raising and education campaigns.

Worrying level of discrimination

Antisemitism casts a long shadow on Jewish people’s chances to enjoy their legally guaranteed rights to human dignity, freedom of thought, conscience and religion, and non-discrimination. The daily insults, discrimination, harassment and even physical violence, with which Jewish people across the European Union (EU) must contend, show few signs of abating, despite EU and EU Member States’ best efforts. Nevertheless, little information exists on the extent and nature of antisemitic crimes to guide policy makers seeking to effectively fight these crimes. This FRA survey is the first-ever to collect comparable data on Jewish people’s experiences and perceptions of antisemitism, hate-motivated crime and discrimination across a number of EU Member States,  specifically in Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Its findings reveal a worrying level of discrimination, particularly in employment and education, a widespread fear of victimisation and heightening concern about antisemitism online.
By shining light on crimes that all too often remain unreported and therefore invisible, this FRA report seeks to help put an end to them.

More to be done

John Mann, chair of the UK’s all-party parliamentary group against antisemitism, said he was shocked by the survey’s results.

“It is extraordinary that 75 years after the terrible events of Kristallnacht, Jews are again living in fear,” he said. “The inaction of the European commission in combating antisemitism is inexcusable.”

Mann said the EU had to do more to co-ordinate Holocaust education work and to crack down on online antisemitism.

“The internet is a classic EU territory because it crosses borders and the EU could have a huge impact – if it had a thorough approach to antisemitism and other hatred and abuse on the internet,” he said.

A spokesman for the Community Security Trust, which monitors antisemitism and provides security for the UK Jewish community, said the research showed that much more needed to be done to protect Jewish people across Europe.

“In some countries, including Britain, politicians and police are trying to deal with the problem, but these efforts are sorely needed everywhere,” the spokesman said.

“Jews also require basic anti-racist solidarity in all of this – solidarity that has been partial, or deliberately denied, far too often since the year 2000.”

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Please do find also to read:

  1. Ambassador Gutman and the relationship between the inhabitants of Belgium
  2. Built on or Belonging to Jewish tradition #3 Of the earth or of God
  3. Migrants to the West #7 Religions
  4. Pupils asked ‘why do some people hate Jews?’ in GCSE exam
  5. What Are The Sources Of Anti-Semitism? or Why do people hate Jews?
  6. Stand Up
  7. Religion, fundamentalism and murder
  8. Christian fundamentalism as dangerous as Muslim fundamentalism
  9. Welfare state and Poverty in Flanders #3 Right to Human dignity
  10. Jehovah’s Witnesses not only group that preach the good news
  11. A world in denial
  12. Judeo-Christian values and liberty
  13. Anti-Semitic incidents in Australia in 2012 highest ever on record

In Dutch:

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To me, it demonstrates the outdated mentality of a post-war generation. Too many of us are trapped in an anachronistic mind-set, always looking out for examples of antisemitism, always trying to “catch it on the edge of a remark” (as Harold Abrahams put it in Chariots of Fire).
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Being Jewish today can be a lot of fun. I work and socialise primarily with non-Jews, so I milk the Jewish angle whenever possible. I wear a chai necklace, drop Yiddish words into conversation and grow a beard and a Jewfro during the winter months.

Jews could hardly be better-positioned in our multicultural society, part of the mainstream but retaining a crucial bit of edginess. It’s a good place to be. The same goes for America, where the pollster Mark Penn now uses the voter category, philosemite, to describe people who either wanted to marry a Jew or emulate Jewish values.

Of course I’m not suggesting antisemitism is dead. It is an ancient and insidious prejudice that will exist as long as we do. There is still plenty of antisemitism in Britain, whether it’s troglodyte football fans chanting about Auschwitz or belligerent anti-Zionists obsessing over Jewish media influence.

 

  • EU Study: Jews in Germany Fear Rising Anti-Semitism (spiegel.de)
    The survey’s results provide insight into the perceptions, experiences and self-conception of European Jews. Rather than supplying absolute figures on anti-Semitic attacks, the study focuses on the perceived danger of such attacks and how much the anxiety this causes affects their lives.
    +
    In Germany, the KPMD, a service for registering crimes, has recorded a decline in anti-Semitic crimes since 2009. However, by itself, that says nothing about the perceptions of Jews living in Germany. According to the FRA report, 63 percent of the Jewish respondents in Germany have avoided “wearing, carrying or displaying things that might help people identify them as Jews in public,” such as a skullcap (kippa). Likewise, 25 percent of them claimed to have considered emigrating from Germany in the last five years because they don’t feel safe there.

 

When it comes to the relative seriousness of anti-Semitism, Germany was the only country in which a majority (61%) of respondents said it was the greatest problem. Respondents from the other seven countries believed that unemployment was the most pressing issue.

 

  • Alarming early figures from Euro antisemitism poll (thejc.com)
    In France, thousands of Jews have moved to Israel, North America and Britain. In Hungary, the situation is also very concerning, but very different, deriving from far-right nationalists. Then, there is Malmo in Sweden, widely regarded as the worst example of a local community living in fear.

 

In Britain, we are relatively fortunate. CST and the police have had excellent relations since the 1990s and, over the past decade, our politicians have taken antisemitism increasingly seriously.

Many of our continental cousins look on with envy, and really need this survey to kick-start better responses from local officialdom.

  • Poll: 76% of European Jews Believe Anti-Semitism Is On The Rise in Europe (jpupdates.com)
    On the 75th anniversary of Kristelnacht, the European Union Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA) has released the results of their first poll ever that they conducted on Jewish people’s experiences of antisemitic harassment, discrimination and hate crime in the EU. This report, which covers responses from 5,847 Jewish people in the eight countries in which some 90% of the estimated Jewish population in the EU live, will thus be a vital tool for EU decision makers and community groups to develop targeted legal and policy measures.