Pew Research: How People in Muslim Countries Believe Women Should Dress

Writing at Pew Research last year, Jacob Poushter shared University of Michigan research revealing how Muslim populations believe women should (be forced to) dress.

An important issue in the Muslim world is how women should dress in public. A recent survey from the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research conducted in seven Muslim-majority countries (Tunisia, Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia and Turkey), finds that most people prefer that a woman completely cover her hair, but not necessarily her face…

…Only in Turkey and Lebanon do more than one-in-four think it is appropriate for a woman to not cover her head at all in public.

The survey treated the question of women’s dress as a visual preference. Each respondent was given a card depicting six styles of women’s headdress and asked to choose the woman most appropriately outfitted for a public place. Although no labels were included on the card, the styles ranged from a fully-hoodedburqa (woman #1) and niqab (#2) to the less conservative hijab (women #4 and #5). There was also the option of a woman wearing no head covering of any type.

Overall, most respondents say woman #4, whose hair and ears are completely covered by a white hijab, is the most appropriately dressed for public. This includes 57% in Tunisia, 52% in Egypt, 46% in Turkey and 44% in Iraq. In Iraq and Egypt, woman #3, whose hair and ears are covered by a more conservative black hijab, is the second most popular choice. In Pakistan, there is an even split (31% vs. 32%) between woman #3 and woman #2, who is wearing a niqab that exposes only her eyes, while nearly a quarter (24%) choose woman #4. In Saudi Arabia, a 63%-majority prefer woman #2, while an additional 11% say that the burqa worn by woman #1 is the most appropriate style of public dress for women.

In several countries, substantial minorities say it is acceptable for a woman to not cover her hair in public. Roughly a third (32%) of Turks take this view, as do 15% of Tunisians. Nearly half (49%) in Lebanon also agree that it is acceptable for a woman to appear in public without a head covering, although this may partly reflect the fact that the sample in Lebanon was 27% Christian. Demographic information, including results by gender, were not included in the public release of this survey.

+

Preceding articles

The Dress Code for Women in the Quran

Coverings Worn by Muslim Women

Meditating Muslimah on “hijab to be a religious obligation”

Allowing dress code according liberty of religion

++

Additional articles

  1. African misery and women inequality
  2. Festival of Freedom and persecutions
  3. Fitting the bill in the North and in the East

+++

11 thoughts on “Pew Research: How People in Muslim Countries Believe Women Should Dress

  1. Pingback: Al-Azhar urges all Muslim nations to join alliance - RiyadhVision

  2. Pingback: WMC slams terror, urges Muslim unity - RiyadhVision

  3. Pingback: Will Russia boost Mideast ties in 2016? - RiyadhVision

  4. Pingback: The Islamic ‘golden age’ - RiyadhVision

  5. Pingback: UK, U.S. And Euro Area Data Disappoint - Forex Partner

  6. Pingback: Silence, devotion, Salafists, quietists, weaponry, bombings, books, writers and terrorists | Marcus Ampe's Space

  7. Pingback: Celebrate Eid in Style | From guestwriters

  8. Pingback: Secularism in France becoming dangerous for freedom of religion | Belgian Biblestudents - Belgische Bijbelstudenten

  9. Pingback: Christians, secularism, morals and values | Belgian Biblestudents - Belgische Bijbelstudenten

  10. Pingback: Enough already with the ridiculous “they used to be free” memes | From guestwriters

  11. Pingback: Enough with the Clothes Shaming of Muslim Women | From guestwriters

You are welcome to react - U bent welkom om een reactie te geven

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s