A Meaningful Thanksgivukkah

Bijbelvorsers notes:

Believers in the Creator God should see that like the third miracle of Hanukkah, Thanksgiving is not really a story about the Pilgrims. But they also may not take it as a ritual of reconciliation post-civil war. More than the recreation of national mythologies for the sake of mending the wounds of fighting between brothers, we should look at the celebrations as a means to take time to thank God for His being with His people, helping them to undergo the battles in this world, making them strong to struggle and to find ways to survive. For all the blessings we are able to receive in this lifetime we should thank the Most High. It is not bad to meditate on our attitude once in a year and to consider how we can praise Jehovah and be thankful finding our way to live here in this world.

+++

 

  • Happy Thanksgivukkah! (gjnashen.wordpress.com)
    From the glut of Thanksgivukkah swag and kitsch out there, you’d think American Thanksgiving and Hanukkah have never overlapped before or will never overlap again. And that would be correct — at least not for another 70,000 years.
  • Celebrate Thanksgivukkah! (new102.cbslocal.com)
    Normally Hanukkah falls closer to Christmas time, but this year Turkey day is so late in the month that the first night of Hanukkah and Thanksgiving are on the same day.

    So this inspired some awesome merging, kind of like Crystal Pepsi. Wait, you mean Crystal Pepsi wasn’t like the Cristal of Pepsi? OK horrible example. But you get my point.

  • This Is The Official Thanksgivukkah Anthem You’ve Been Waiting For (buzzfeed.com)
    Once every 70,000 years, Hanukkah falls on Thanksgiving. What is it that makes Thanksgivukkah the most spectacular day ever?
  • Thanksgivukkah! (redtreetimes.com)
    This convergence has been dubbed Thansgivukkah.  Kind of catchy, huh?  I don’t know that there is any real significance here but it sure sounds ominous  (and kind of cool) when you throw in the fact that it won’t happen again for another 77,ooo years or so.  And anytime you get to throw around a portmanteau like Thanksgivukkah, it’s got to be good.  So enjoy your Thanksgivukkah, whether you’re thinking about the Pilgrims or the Maccabees.
  • Happy Thanksgivukkah! (marianneknightly.com)
    Upon further research, assuming a generation is about 30 years, that would be about 2,600 “greats” in the above note. But I could be wrong, as I am awful at math.
  • Happy Thanksgivukkah, 1888 (ghostsofdc.org)
    Hanukkah and Thanksgiving rarely overlap.  Among its 22 articles covering 2013′s “Thanksgivukkah” holiday mashup, the Washington Post reports that the convergence of turkey and latkes won’t occur again for 77,798 years.

    How did D.C. media report on this calendar quirk the last time it happened — 125 years ago?

  • Thanksgivukkah Latke Burger! (nycnomnom.com)
    We love our Franken-foods, and now we have a Franken-holiday when the first day of Chanukkah falls on Thanksgiving Day (aka Thanksgivukkah).  Mike, being the Domestic Divo that he is, came home on Friday with an idea: let’s make a Latke Burger!

    The plan: latkes in place of buns, a turkey burger with some brisket in there to add flavor, and cranberry ketchup

  • St. Louis Jews celebrate Thanksgivukkah for first time since 1800s (fox2now.com)
    The chefs at Kohn’s Kosher Deli, also inspired by this rare occurrence, perfected some new Thanksgivukkah dishes, like sweet potato latkes.  Catering Director Robin Rickerman divulged some hints about their recipe: “A little nutmeg, a little cinnamon, and then we top it with sour cream and brown sugar.”

    However, Thanksgivukkah isn’t just about inventive food combinations, or even turkey-shaped menorahs.  Rabbi Yosef Landa with Chabad of Greater St. Louis says the two holidays share some meaning.

    He explains, “One of the messages of Hanukkah is really the same as Thanksgiving. The great miracles that happened, and the Maccabees in their battle to preserve their religious freedom, they established the holiday to give thanks for all the wonderful miracles that happened to them.”

    Even though these holidays won’t coincide for another 70,000 years or more, their powerful messages will remain.  As for those tasty new traditions?  Kohn’s Kosher Deli plans to keep them going.  Rickerman says, “Every year Thanksgiving now, I think we’re going to serve sweet potato latkes, and different stuffings in our donuts.”

  • Thanksgivukkah mashes up rare double holiday (cbc.ca)
    Jews in the U.S. are marking an unusual convergence of secular and religious holidays with American Thanksgiving falling on the second day of Hanukkah, creating the once-in-a-lifetime hybrid holiday Thanksgivukkah.
  • What’s going on Thursday? (Thanksgivukkah!) (brooklynvegan.com)
    Mazel Tofurkey

Said to Myself

aviOn their surfaces, Hanukkah and Thanksgiving are simple holidays.  We see the themes of light breaking through the darkness, a few banding together to beat the elements, and the power of having faith in community.  We camp folk know that nothing is ever as simple as it seems.  So let’s look deeper into the three miracles of Hanukkah.  One miracle is that small group of zealots were able to beat the stronger forces and regain control of the Temple.  When they recaptured the Temple they found one small jar of oil for the menorah in the Temple.  The second miracle was that despite the fact that this small jar only had enough oil for one day it lasted for eight days.  This story about the miraculous Hanukkah oil has allowed us to look past focusing solely on the military victory.  This is important in that the war was not a…

View original post 423 more words

Advertisements

One thought on “A Meaningful Thanksgivukkah

  1. Pingback: Thanksgivukkah and Advent | Stepping Toes

You are welcome to react - U bent welkom om een reactie te geven

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s