God Isn’t a Republican

U.S. Supreme Court building.

U.S. Supreme Court building. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Man has always to be very careful not to trap in the marauder’s poisoned snare. Living in this world he may not be off the world but has to stand strong in his faith and always keep human dignity.

Knowing we are weak we must trust on the Most High and make sure that we do stay living according to the Will and the Law of the Most High Divine Creator, being sure that once His son shall govern here on earth at the only best governement, the Kingdom of Christ, being part of the Kingdom of God.

*

To remember

God =/=

  1. face of any political organization
  2. ministry, face of mega churches or popular religious leaders
  3. not Democrat or Republican, liberal or conservative

+

God =/=  enclosed within stained glass or marble.

 

God doesn’t mock women, poor, disabled, condemn people

God forgives

+

Stop the idolatry => Stand up for peace, protection, human dignity, freedom and healing for all Americans before and after the election no matter who wins.

++

Additional reading

  1. Coming closer to the end of 2015 and the end for Donald Trump as presidential candidate
  2. Walls,colours, multiculturalism, money to flow, Carson, Trump and consorts
  3. When so desperate to hold onto power
  4. Are United States of America citizens going to show their senses
  5. Brexit No. 2 Blow-up
  6. Nigel Farage called Donald Trump’s victory ‘bigger than Brexit’
  7. Trump et al.— The Global Storm
  8. Jews the next scapegoat for Donald Trump
  9. The American clouds of Anti-Semitism
  10. Blinded crying blue murder having being made afraid by a bugaboo
  11. Trump brand of migrant demonization #1
  12. Children of Men
  13. Kingdom of God what will it be like

+++

Save

Anti-Semitism ‘on the rise’ in Europe

For some years now in Belgium we see a bad evolution, similar as the trend was evolving in the 1930s Berlin.

Media creating an idea of danger

Once a world full of entertainment and “joy de vivre”, without financial restriction the people loved to have their freedom, going out until late in the morning.  Being drunk they passed others, but found themselves, by their anti-social behaviour more looked at. This annoyed them. with the financial crisis they also saw that they could not any more enjoy their going out “a volonté” and could not have so many trips to other countries any more. Aannoying as well was that some cheaper regions became more dangerous because of Muslim Fundamentalists. Those also came more in the news and tried to get more Belgians involved in their ‘road to Damascus’. Sharia for Belgium took care that the Muslim community came in a worse picture, and the media did the rest to present all those Muslims as a danger for our community.

The banks corrupting and the financial market bringing down the people with the little savings while the Jews still kept the thriving market of jewellery. Seeing those sometimes ‘poorly’ black dressed Jews was a sneer in the face of those who envied their money.

Antisemitism is one of the most alarming examples of how prejudice can endure, lingering on for centuries, curbing Jewish people’s chances to enjoy their legally guaranteed rights to human dignity, freedom of thought, conscience and religion or non-discrimination. Despite European Union (EU) and Member States’ best efforts, many Jews across the EU continue to face insults, discrimination, harassment and physical violence that may keep them from living
their lives openly as Jews. Nevertheless, there is little concrete information available on the extent and nature of antisemitism that Jewish people encounter in the EU today – whether at work, in public places, at school or in the media – information critical to policy makers seeking to craft effective solutions to bring an end to such discrimination.

Nazi Anti-Semitic propaganda at Yad Vashem

Nazi Anti-Semitic propaganda at Yad Vashem (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Data by European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights

The European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) has reported on the available official and unofficial data on antisemitic incidents in its Annual report on Fundamental rights: challenges and achievements, as well as in a separate annual working paper – Antisemitism: Summary overview of the situation in the EU – which presents trends on the available data covering up to 10 years. This provides a long-term view of the developments concerning
antisemitic incidents. These reports are part of FRA’s body of work on hate crime, shining light on the experiences of various groups such as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) persons, immigrants and ethnic minorities, and persons with disabilities.

The available data fail to answer many questions, however, which are of keen interest to policy makers looking to improve responses to antisemitic acts. Effective solutions require information on the types of antisemitic incidents, the context in which they take place and the reasons why many incidents are not reported at all, indeed, why official statistics markedly underestimate the number of antisemitic incidents and the number of people exposed to these acts.
Furthermore, even the most basic official statistics on antisemitic incidents are not available in many EU Member States.

Need for rallying against something

For some it might be clear that people need something to rally against to stay united. A good example of that we could see in the ‘Cold War’ where we had the West against the East, the Americans against the Soviets. Many do think it was the best time when they had the USA to rally against the USSR. Several Americans do find they have come to sit in a slow-motion train wreck of a divisive, culturally degenerative society ever since the Soviet Union ceased to give them purpose and unity.

Others consider that certain people are looking for it by placing themselves as a separate people. They are convinced that the Jewish religion encourages a separate identity for Jews, asking them to keep themselves apart in certain respects from the cultures they live within. That naturally can lead to conflict. People hate certain Christians for much the same reason. Those who want to follow the Only One God undergo the difficulty of ‘not being of this world’ and still having ‘to be part of this world’. Non-trinitarians are as ridiculed and confounded as the Jews who have the same God of Abraham. (Check in your own environment how people do think for example of Jehovah Witnesses.)

Blamed for suffering

It's not a question of religion, the Jew is of...

It’s not a question of religion, the Jew is of a different race and the enemy of ours. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Historically, Jews have had religious traditions and doctrines that have allowed them to thrive (or at least survive) where others have struggled. Because those people did follow the Laws of the Divine Creator somehow they also where protected and blessed by this Creator God. They also seemed to cope better with their struggle for life and their suffering, which was a thorn in the flesh for the people around them who underwent more difficulties with the same problems.

During the Black Plague, Jews washed themselves more often than once a year, which reduced their infection rate; they were blamed.
Due to Christian bans on usury, they were inevitably the money lenders; they were blamed.

Having been able to cope with many diseases, many terrible incidents, every-time springing up again, like not destroyable weed, always forming one union with their community, combined with being members of a highly visible minority where race and religion are not equal but intermingled, is sufficient to trigger envy by others who also look at the actions taken in Israel where walls are build and Palestinians provoked.

2012 Survey

5,847 self-identified Jewish people (aged 16 years or over) in eight EU Member States – Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Sweden and the
United Kingdom gave their answers for the survey which was carried out online during September and October 2012.

Two thirds of the survey respondents (66 %) consider antisemitism to be a problem across the eight EU Member States surveyed, while on average three quarters of the respondents (76 %) also believe that the situation has become more acute and that antisemitism has increased in the country where they live over the past five years. In the 12 months following the survey, close to half of the respondents (46 %) worry about being verbally insulted or harassed in a public place because they are Jewish, and one third (33 %) worry about being physically attacked in the country where they live because they are Jewish. Furthermore, 66 % of parents or grandparents of school-aged children worry that their children could be subjected to antisemitic verbal insults or harassment at school or en route, and 52 % worry that they would be physically attacked with an antisemitic motive while at school or en route. In the past 12 months, over half of all survey respondents (57 %) heard or saw someone claim that the Holocaust was a myth or that it has been exaggerated.

Protecting Jewish people from discrimination

About one quarter of respondents (23 %) said that they have felt discriminated against on the grounds of their religion or ethnic background in the 12 months preceding the survey. Specifically concerning discrimination because of being Jewish, the respondents in all eight EU Member States indicate that they are most likely to experience discrimination at the workplace (11 % of respondents who were working during the period have experienced this), when looking for work (10 % of respondents who have been looking for work) or on the part of people working in the education sector (8 % of respondents in school or training or whose children were in school or training have felt discriminated against by people working in this area). More than three quarters (82 %) of those who said that they have felt discriminated against during the period because they are Jewish did not report the most serious incident, namely the one that most affected them, to any authority or organisation.

Antisemitism on the internet

Antisemitism on the internet – including, for example, antisemitic comments made in discussion forums and on social networking sites – is a significant concern for a majority of respondents. Overall, 75 % of respondents consider antisemitism online to be a problem, while another 73 % believe antisemitism online has increased over the last five years.
More than 80 % of the respondents living in Belgium, France, Hungary and Italy are concerned by the level of antisemitism on the internet which they say has increased either a lot or a little. Antisemitic hostility in public places and antisemitism in the media are the next two manifestations that respondents are most likely to perceive as on the rise.

Meeting the needs of Jewish victims of hate crime

Antisemitism in Budapest Gyermekavasut

Antisemitism in Budapest Gyermekavasut (Photo credit: Yigal Chamish)

One quarter of respondents (26 %) experienced some form of antisemitic harassment in the 12 months preceding the survey – including various offensive and threatening acts, for example, receiving written anti-semitic messages, phone calls, being followed or receiving offensive antisemitic comments in person or on the internet, according to the survey results. Overall, 4 % of respondents experienced physical violence or threats of violence because they are Jewish in the 12 months preceding the survey. Of all respondents, 3 % on average said that their personal property has been deliberately vandalised, because they are Jewish, in the 12 months preceding the survey. A majority of the victims of anti-semitic harassment (76 %), physical violence or threats (64 %), or vandalism of personal property (53 %) did not report the most serious incident, namely the one that most affected the respondent, in the past five years to the police or to any other organisation protecting Jewish people from discrimination The relative position of antisemitism on the list of other social and political issues varies slightly among the EU Member States surveyed. When asked to consider whether each of the items presented is a problem or not in the country where they live, the respondents rated unemployment (85 % saying that it was ‘a very big’ or ‘a fairly big problem’), state of the economy (78 %) and racism (72 %) ahead of antisemitism (66 %) in terms of the present magnitude of the problem. Anti-semitism was followed as a problem, respondents said, by crime levels (62 %), immigration (59 %), religious intolerance (54 %), state of health services (51 %) and government corruption (40 %). In contrast with other countries, in Germany antisemitism was regarded as the greatest problem (61 %) in comparison to the other issues listed in the survey, such as unemployment (59 %), racism (57 %) or others.

Respondents from all the EU Member States surveyed except of Germany – consider unemployment to be the most pressing issue facing the country where they live.
Over 90 % of respondents in five countries (France, Hungary, Italy, Latvia and the United Kingdom) saw the state of the economy as ‘a very big’ or ‘a fairly big problem’. Respondents in Germany and Sweden seem less concerned with the state of the economy – 41 % and 25 % of the respondents, respectively, said it is ‘a very big’ or ‘a fairly big problem’.

Most pressing social and political issues

Antisemitism was rated among the three most pressing social and political issues in France, Germany and Sweden (85 %, 61 % and 60 %, respectively, considered it ‘a very big’ or ‘a fairly big problem’). In a pattern that differs slightly from the other survey countries, respondents in Belgium viewed – besides unemployment – crime levels and immigration as the problems which most affect the country where they live (81 % and 80 %, respectively).

Respondents in Hungary and Italy alone considered government corruption to be among the top three problems in the country where they live (94 % of respondents voiced this opinion in both countries). A notable share of respondents in Latvia and the United Kingdom identified the state of health services as a problem (92 % and 69 % of respondents, respectively).

Respondents were also asked whether they felt that antisemitism has increased or decreased during the past five years in the country where they live. Antisemitism is reported to be on the increase – having increased ‘a lot’ or increased ‘a little’ – by a majority of respondents in all eight EU Member States surveyed . The percentage of respondents indicating that antisemitism has increased over the past five years was especially high (about 90 %) in Belgium, France and Hungary. These are also the countries, as shown earlier, where the respondents were most likely to say that antisemitism is ‘a very
big’ or ‘a fairly big problem’ today.

Manifestations and Attacks to affect community

Antisemitic attacks have a profound impact not only on the individuals concerned and those close to them, but certain manifestations of antisemitism also affect the Jewish community as a whole.

Among the specific manifestations listed, online antisemitism is seen as a particular problem: three quarters of all respondents (75 %) consider this either ‘a very big’ or a ‘fairly big problem’, and almost as many (73 %) believe that it hasincreased over the past five year.

59 % of the respondents feel that antisemitism in the media is ‘a very big’ or ‘a fairly big problem’, while 54 % say the same about expressions of hostility towards Jews in the street and other public places. Half (50 %) consider desecration of cemeteries to be a problem.

The majority of the respondents in France (84 %), Belgium (74 %) and Hungary (72 %) consider expressions of hostility towards Jews in the street and other public spaces to be ‘a very big’ or ‘a fairly big problem’ in the country. In Sweden (51 %) and Germany (48 %), about half the respondents consider it a problem, while in Italy (30 %) or the United Kingdom (35 %) one third of the respondents do so.

Arena’s

Regarding the four arenas where antisemitic comments may occur and comparing the eight survey countries, respondents from Belgium, France and Hungary indicate in particular antisemitic reporting in the media (64 %, 70 %, and 71 %, respectively, to be ‘a very big problem’ or ‘a fairly big problem’) and antisemitic comments in discussions people have (69 %, 72 %, and 76 %, respectively). Respondents in France and Hungary (87 % each) highlight political speeches and discussions. Respondents in Latvia were less likely than those in the other countries surveyed to highlight any of the four arenas as very or fairly problematic with regard to spreading antisemitic content. In Sweden and the United Kingdom, less than half of all respondents consider that  antisemitic content is ‘a very big’ or ‘a fairly big problem’ in three of the four arenas, with the exception of antisemitism on the internet, for which respondents living in those two countries also give a higher rating, seeing it as a problem.

Prevalence and context of negative statements about Jews

Hearing or seeing statements that offend human dignity by assigning fictional negative attributes to individuals as members of a group can be detrimental to Jewish people’s sense of safety and security and undermine their ability to live their lives openly as Jews. The FRA survey addresses this issue by asking respondents to what extent they have been exposed to certain statements selected for the survey, and whether they consider these statements antisemitic. The statements selected cover various issues including the role of the Jewish community in society, their interests and distinctiveness, attitudes towards historical experiences and current issues. These statements do not necessarily reflect the whole spectrum of antisemitic views or connotations. They were used to guide the respondent into thinking about situations where they may have heard negative comments about Jewish people, in order to identify the contexts in which Jewish people hear these comments and to describe the person or persons who made the comments.
Respondents’ assessments concerning these statements offer an insight into the issues which they consider antisemitic. Respondents’ sensitivity to all things (perceived as) antisemitic has an impact on all of the other survey results.
First, the survey respondents were asked how often they have heard or seen non-Jewish people make these statements, in what contexts they have heard or seen them, and respondents’ perceptions concerning those who made these statements. The information concerning the medium used for making these statements and the context in which they are made can help the EU and its Member States in designing measures to counteract the use of such statements, for example, through awareness-raising and education campaigns.

Worrying level of discrimination

Antisemitism casts a long shadow on Jewish people’s chances to enjoy their legally guaranteed rights to human dignity, freedom of thought, conscience and religion, and non-discrimination. The daily insults, discrimination, harassment and even physical violence, with which Jewish people across the European Union (EU) must contend, show few signs of abating, despite EU and EU Member States’ best efforts. Nevertheless, little information exists on the extent and nature of antisemitic crimes to guide policy makers seeking to effectively fight these crimes. This FRA survey is the first-ever to collect comparable data on Jewish people’s experiences and perceptions of antisemitism, hate-motivated crime and discrimination across a number of EU Member States,  specifically in Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Its findings reveal a worrying level of discrimination, particularly in employment and education, a widespread fear of victimisation and heightening concern about antisemitism online.
By shining light on crimes that all too often remain unreported and therefore invisible, this FRA report seeks to help put an end to them.

More to be done

John Mann, chair of the UK’s all-party parliamentary group against antisemitism, said he was shocked by the survey’s results.

“It is extraordinary that 75 years after the terrible events of Kristallnacht, Jews are again living in fear,” he said. “The inaction of the European commission in combating antisemitism is inexcusable.”

Mann said the EU had to do more to co-ordinate Holocaust education work and to crack down on online antisemitism.

“The internet is a classic EU territory because it crosses borders and the EU could have a huge impact – if it had a thorough approach to antisemitism and other hatred and abuse on the internet,” he said.

A spokesman for the Community Security Trust, which monitors antisemitism and provides security for the UK Jewish community, said the research showed that much more needed to be done to protect Jewish people across Europe.

“In some countries, including Britain, politicians and police are trying to deal with the problem, but these efforts are sorely needed everywhere,” the spokesman said.

“Jews also require basic anti-racist solidarity in all of this – solidarity that has been partial, or deliberately denied, far too often since the year 2000.”

+

Please do find also to read:

  1. Ambassador Gutman and the relationship between the inhabitants of Belgium
  2. Built on or Belonging to Jewish tradition #3 Of the earth or of God
  3. Migrants to the West #7 Religions
  4. Pupils asked ‘why do some people hate Jews?’ in GCSE exam
  5. What Are The Sources Of Anti-Semitism? or Why do people hate Jews?
  6. Stand Up
  7. Religion, fundamentalism and murder
  8. Christian fundamentalism as dangerous as Muslim fundamentalism
  9. Welfare state and Poverty in Flanders #3 Right to Human dignity
  10. Jehovah’s Witnesses not only group that preach the good news
  11. A world in denial
  12. Judeo-Christian values and liberty
  13. Anti-Semitic incidents in Australia in 2012 highest ever on record

In Dutch:

+++

 

 

To me, it demonstrates the outdated mentality of a post-war generation. Too many of us are trapped in an anachronistic mind-set, always looking out for examples of antisemitism, always trying to “catch it on the edge of a remark” (as Harold Abrahams put it in Chariots of Fire).
+

Being Jewish today can be a lot of fun. I work and socialise primarily with non-Jews, so I milk the Jewish angle whenever possible. I wear a chai necklace, drop Yiddish words into conversation and grow a beard and a Jewfro during the winter months.

Jews could hardly be better-positioned in our multicultural society, part of the mainstream but retaining a crucial bit of edginess. It’s a good place to be. The same goes for America, where the pollster Mark Penn now uses the voter category, philosemite, to describe people who either wanted to marry a Jew or emulate Jewish values.

Of course I’m not suggesting antisemitism is dead. It is an ancient and insidious prejudice that will exist as long as we do. There is still plenty of antisemitism in Britain, whether it’s troglodyte football fans chanting about Auschwitz or belligerent anti-Zionists obsessing over Jewish media influence.

 

  • EU Study: Jews in Germany Fear Rising Anti-Semitism (spiegel.de)
    The survey’s results provide insight into the perceptions, experiences and self-conception of European Jews. Rather than supplying absolute figures on anti-Semitic attacks, the study focuses on the perceived danger of such attacks and how much the anxiety this causes affects their lives.
    +
    In Germany, the KPMD, a service for registering crimes, has recorded a decline in anti-Semitic crimes since 2009. However, by itself, that says nothing about the perceptions of Jews living in Germany. According to the FRA report, 63 percent of the Jewish respondents in Germany have avoided “wearing, carrying or displaying things that might help people identify them as Jews in public,” such as a skullcap (kippa). Likewise, 25 percent of them claimed to have considered emigrating from Germany in the last five years because they don’t feel safe there.

 

When it comes to the relative seriousness of anti-Semitism, Germany was the only country in which a majority (61%) of respondents said it was the greatest problem. Respondents from the other seven countries believed that unemployment was the most pressing issue.

 

  • Alarming early figures from Euro antisemitism poll (thejc.com)
    In France, thousands of Jews have moved to Israel, North America and Britain. In Hungary, the situation is also very concerning, but very different, deriving from far-right nationalists. Then, there is Malmo in Sweden, widely regarded as the worst example of a local community living in fear.

 

In Britain, we are relatively fortunate. CST and the police have had excellent relations since the 1990s and, over the past decade, our politicians have taken antisemitism increasingly seriously.

Many of our continental cousins look on with envy, and really need this survey to kick-start better responses from local officialdom.

  • Poll: 76% of European Jews Believe Anti-Semitism Is On The Rise in Europe (jpupdates.com)
    On the 75th anniversary of Kristelnacht, the European Union Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA) has released the results of their first poll ever that they conducted on Jewish people’s experiences of antisemitic harassment, discrimination and hate crime in the EU. This report, which covers responses from 5,847 Jewish people in the eight countries in which some 90% of the estimated Jewish population in the EU live, will thus be a vital tool for EU decision makers and community groups to develop targeted legal and policy measures.

 

European Parliament stands for human dignity

From the European Dignity Watch, a non-governmental and non-profit organization based in Europe’s capital Brussels.

The European Dignity Watch Network is composed of national and international non-governmental organisations, opinion makers, experts and interested individuals who work on safeguarding an environment in which the human person can flourish.

English: Belgium, Bruxelles - Brussel, Europea...

Belgium, Bruxelles – Brussel, European Parliament. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

On Tuesday 22 October, the EU-Parliament voted on a Report on Sexual  and Reproductive Health and Rights claiming a fundamental right to abortion that aims at politically neutralize the European Citizen Initiative “One of Us“. The resolution also calls for an improvement of State regulation to limit the exercise of the freedom of religions, conscience and conscientious objection.

It calls for an EU wide compulsory sex education in primary schools “provided in a taboo-free interactive atmosphere between students and educators” and must convey a positive image of homosexuality. The 40-pages resolution reads like a manual on how to restrict fundamental freedoms in Europe. MEPs must vote therefore to adopt the Motion for an Alternative Resolution.

As reaction to the popular success of the European Citizen Initiative “One of Us” on the implementation of EU case law C-34/10 – stating that the human being starts with conception and that the human embryo represents a precise stage of development of the human body, its human dignity is protected by the relevant legal instruments -, the EU-Parliament voted, Tuesday 22 October, in Strasbourg one week before the deadline of “One of Us”, one of the most successful citizen campaigns in recent European history, on a resolution promoting free and safe abortion for all (Estrela report A7-0306/2013).

*

In a loud and lively debate that is not often seen in this intensity at the European Parliament, a majority of MEPs voted for a referral back to committee of the highly controversial Estrela report on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights. European Dignity Watch reported.

After the voting was complete, 351 MEPs voted to send the pro-abortion bill back to committee while 319 voted against the move to zap the legislation.

Reproductive Health Ribbon

Reproductive Health Ribbon (Photo credit: Jason Licerio)

Although an alternative resolution, which sought to promote a dignified vision of maternal health, protect freedom of conscience and healthy sexual education for children, was not adopted, it is called a great victory that the report has not been adopted and Pro-lifers in the European Parliament scored a major victory.

A referral back to committee will give time to investigate further the numerous problematic points of this report, especially the fact that it was co-written by the commercial abortion organisation International Planned Parenthood Federation in Brussels.

In the weeks leading up to the vote today, there has been growing awareness among MEPs of the deep problems related to an understanding of sexual and reproductive health that puts hypersexualisation of children from the earliest age on, a ‘right to abortion’ for all and a severe limitation of freedom of conscience at its centre.

Tuesday, Parliament has sent a clear signal that this radical approach is not shared by the majority.

“We are very happy that not only Parliament came to its senses today with regards to sexual and reprductive health, but also that the voice of 1.4 Million citizens who signed the European Citizen Initiative “One of Us” for a greater protection of human dignity are heard and represented in today’s decision”, says executive director of European Dignity Watch, Sophia Kuby.

S&D Euro MP Edite Estrela (Portugal), who drafted the resolution, said after the vote that Conservative MEPs wanted to “set women’s rights back 30 years”.

“I deeply regret the decision taken today. On several occasions, this Parliament has recognised the right for everyone to make their own informed and responsible choices on their sexual and reproductive life,” she said.

“The draft resolution was approved by the women’s committee with a strong majority of 17 votes in favour, 7 abstentions and 7 against. By not respecting the outcome of the vote in parliamentary committee, the conservatives want to set women’s rights back 30 years.”

Pavan Dhaliwal, BHA Head of Public Affairs, commented

‘This is an excellent report which aims to ensure that young people across Europe are entitled to decent and age-appropriate SRE, that women can access safe and legal abortion services, and which pushes to strengthen LGBTI rights. Unfortunately, its progress has been stalled by yesterday’s vote because socially conservative religious groups have been frantically lobbying MEPs to reject it. These socially conservative groups wish to deny women, LGBTI people, and young people in general their right to access sexual and reproductive health services, and their right to decent Sex and Relationships Education. They are trying to hold back the advances in human rights and personal freedoms which have taken place in Europe over the past few decades, and they are fighting a losing battle.’

Roger Kiska with the Alliance Defending Freedom, or ADF said earlier:

“The European Parliament’s proposed resolution is an affront to national sovereignty, a breach of their duty to the citizens of the European Union and worst of all an unsolicited attack on innocent human life.

The notion that abortion on demand could be declared a human right flies in the face of the facts. In reality, it is a “clear” violation of real human rights.

Pro-life and pro-family organizations are on the rise, but pro-abortion forces are still strong within government institutions and the European Parliament.

+

Find also:

Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality – Report on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=REPORT&mode=XML&reference=A7-2013-306&language=EN

MEPs who voted for and against sending the Report back to the Committee: http://www.lgbt-ep.eu/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/RCV-Vote-on-referral-back-to-FEMM.pdf

Read more about the BHA’s campaigns work on PSHE and Sex and Relationships Education: http://humanism.org.uk/campaigns/schools-and-education/school-curriculum/pshe-and-sex-and-relationships-education/

+++

  • Vote to elevate abortion to ‘human right’ (wnd.com)
    Despite escalating political opposition and the lack of legal jurisdiction, the full European Parliament is set to vote on a resolution declaring abortion and mandatory sexual education for children to be “human rights,” while launching an undisguised attack on the conscientious-objection rights of medical professionals.The deeply controversial “Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights” measure, backed by powerful Socialist Party forces and Planned Parenthood, has already been approved in committee.

    However, critics of the resolution are attacking it on multiple fronts – legal, ethical, human rights centered, pragmatic and more – and opposition is growing fast as pro-life and pro-family forces rally against it.

  • Religious lobby groups block report on sexual and reproductive rights in European Parliament (humanism.org.uk)
    The Report calls for universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights throughout Europe. It covers issues such as abortion rights, LGBTI rights and young people’s entitlement to decent SRE. It calls for access to safe and legal abortion services, comprehensive education on sexuality, teaching about negative LGBTI stereotypes and teaching on the prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections. It also recommends against the mandatory sterilisation of transgender persons, calls for universal access to medically assisted procreation for single women and lesbian couples, and calls for the right to access non-discriminatory information about sexual orientation and gender identity.
  • EU Measure Seeks to Declare Abortion a ‘Human Right’ (cnsnews.com)
    Even in countries where abortion is legal, the report states, it is often made unavailable “through the abuse of conscientious objection or overly restrictive interpretations of existing limits.”  Other obstacles include “medically unnecessary waiting periods or biased counseling.”(Some E.U. countries have compulsory waiting period of up to seven days and pre-abortion counseling, either for all women or in some cases for adolescents only.)

    The measure would therefore require member states to “regulate and monitor the use of conscientious objection so as to ensure that reproductive health care is guaranteed as an individual’s right, while access to lawful services is ensured and appropriate and affordable referrals systems are in place.”

  • Tories vote with BNP to ‘set womens’ rights back 30 years’ (leftfootforward.org)
    Tory MEPs have voted with the BNP in the European Parliament against a resolution supporting womens’ sexual and reproductive health after caving in to pressure from ‘pro-life’ activists.Tory mepsFour Tory MEPs yesterday voted against a report which called for a rights-based approach to access to sexual and reproductive healthcare that is free from discrimination, despite the fact that even UKIP MEPs backed it.
  • Pro-lifers score victory in European Parliament (catholicherald.co.uk)
    The report exposed data on adolescent birth rates and on unwanted pregnancies showing that in many countries where abortion is not permitted women are obliged to “travel to other MS to have an abortion”, so, she said, “it is evident that the ban on abortion does not encourage decreasing its rate”.Moreover, MsEstrela stated that the focus on family policies to face the demographic crisis is spreading the idea that permitting abortion would be a factor of population decrease whereas a ban on it would increase births. The report said “the birth rate in Europe would certainly be more efficiently supported by the improvement of the possibilities for mothers and fathers to better balance their private and professional lives”.
  • Ep May Declare Abortion a ‘Human Right’ in Vote on Tuesday | Tmi (andrewazzopardi.org)
    Critics see the move as an attempt to dictate abortion policy to individual European Union governments, despite an acknowledgement by leading EU institutions that there is no consensus on the matter across the EU’s 28 member-states.The EP’s committee passed the controversial draft report last month on women’s rights and gender equality.

    Twenty EU member states legally permit abortion on demand, while six others have limitations that are either interpreted broadly (Britain, Finland, Cyprus) or restrictively (Ireland, Poland, Luxembourg).

    Malta prohibits all abortions.

    Even in countries where abortion is legal, the report states, it is often made unavailable “through the abuse of conscientious objection or overly restrictive interpretations of existing limits”. Other obstacles include “medically unnecessary waiting periods or biased counselling”. Some EU countries have compulsory waiting period of up to seven days and pre-abortion counselling, either for all women or in some cases for adolescents only.

  • European Parliament Votes Against Making Abortion a Human Right (freebeacon.com)
    Conscientious objections by doctors and existing legal limits on abortion were singled out by the report as reasons for forcing EU member states to guarantee abortion as an individual’s right.
  • European Parliament rejects resolution declaring abortion a fundamental ‘human right’ (aconservativeedge.wordpress.com)
    Pro-life lobbyists at the European Union are declaring a victory after the European Parliament rejected a resolution that would have declared abortion to be a ‘human right,’ and demanded that all EU countries legalize the practices.
  • Vote to elevate abortion to ‘Human Right’ (webporter.wordpress.com)
    Despite escalating political opposition and the lack of legal jurisdiction, the full European Parliament is set to vote on a resolution declaring abortion and mandatory sexual education for children to be “human rights,” while launching an undisguised attack on the conscientious-objection rights of medical professionals.The deeply controversial “Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights” measure, backed by powerful Socialist Party forces and Planned Parenthood, has already been approved in committee.

    However, critics of the resolution are attacking it on multiple fronts – legal, ethical, human rights centered, pragmatic and more – and opposition is growing fast as pro-life and pro-family forces rally against it.