Did the internet fueled a heightened sense of unrest among people?

Buy your copy of The Wired Soul in the Bible Gateway StoreTricia McCary Rhodes (@soulrest) who wrote the book, The Wired Soul: Finding Spiritual Balance in a Hyperconnected Age (NavPress, 2016) finds that

Most people would say they live with an internal angst that they can’t always put their finger on.

She thinks

This is because the Internet has changed our very way of being in this world, compelling us to be perpetually “on” — from our cars to our computers, our tablets to our smartphones, our desks to our living rooms or dining tables, our churches to our libraries to our schools. This 24/7 connection means we’re never really free and we always feel behind. The Internet also continually entices us to explore its options through hyperlinks and ads so we can spend a lot of time on things for which we have little to show, adding to our unrest.

We also see that lots of youngsters are continually on social media, though when we hear them many feel very lonely. But every time busy on the net makes that most of us are rarely, if ever, alone with our own minds and souls.

Even when we do find a few minutes of quiet, we’re driven to check our devices for emails, texts, etc.; to surf the Web or to post on social media.

I might add that even if you’ve managed to remain a Luddite — one who resists technology — you’re surrounded by people who don’t, so you’re affected more than you may realize.

Tricia McCary Rhodessays Tricia McCary Rhodes.

It looks like many today want to stay connected with the world 24/7 and do find it their duty to be up to date with the headlines, though nobody still find the time to go deeper into the material. It all has become very superflucious. Superficiality abounds.

The author remarks

Distraction, which David Wells calls “the affliction of this age,” troubles them like a pesky fly buzzing around their head that won’t go away. Most people just give up after a few minutes of this and feel guilty or embarrassed at their lack. It’s always been hard to focus in prayer; the technology has upped the ante exponentially.

As Christ-followers, we can find guidance for life in the Bible. From it and from our worldly research material we know we can only avoid being shaped by our culture through the renewal of our minds; a word that means complete renovation (Romans 12:2).

From a brain science perspective, this happens as we engage in godly habits or focus and apply God’s truth often enough and long enough to ensure those cells fire together until they’re wired together and a deep pathway between them is formed. This means that the renewal of our minds—a work requiring God’s grace and guidance—is more about what we do than what we know; or in other words, more about the spiritual habits we keep than the amount of biblical information we might attain.

Read more about it in:

The Wired Soul: An Interview with Tricia McCary Rhodes

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