Cohabitating Seniors and the Meaning of Marriage

Today older persons seem to question their position with each other and wonder if they have made the right choice some years ago or if they should not choose to bring some change in their relationship.

Some may have to face the natural loss of their partner, but others willingly looked to break their bonds and go other ways. Though loneliness is not always easy to cope with.

In many countries the fiscal situation for people who are not married is in the advantage of having more money over in the own pocket. But sometimes this does not make it so easy for the one who lives the longest and for the children of such not officially married partners. In many countries, like Belgium, the state offered a ‘Co-habiting contract’ for such people who do not want to go for marriage vows but want to secure their finances with each other.

In the picture today, may also be that several men or women once their partner of the other sex died or is gone away, they prefer to go to live together, either to share the bed or not with somebody of the same sex.

Everybody should know where they would like to go to in their life and which decisions they want to take, this to accordance with their own believes. For lovers of God it is clear that they best follow the instructions available in the Holy Scriptures. There they do not have to consider only their own relationship but also their relationship with God.

+++
  • Divorce law overhaul: Is there really any point to marriage anymore? (telegraph.co.uk)
    The only problem with a no-nup is that it till doesn’t provide the same sort of divorce rights, or rights around children, that marriage would, meaning marriage still wins out. So when Sir James Munby, president of the High Court Family Division and the most senior family judge in England and Wales, recently spoke about wanting to give unmarried couples similar legal protections to married ones, I was pretty thrilled.
    +
    It makes me wonder if there’s really any point to getting married anymore. If I meet The One, we can live happily (and financially safely enough) without having to publicly declare our love for each other in an overly expensive ceremony. Right?

    According to family lawyer Marilyn Stowe, of Stowe Family Law, it’s not that simple. She says: “The legislation for cohabitation, if it ever happened, wouldn’t equate the remits of divorce with cohabitation. In other words, you wouldn’t be able to get a divorce-style settlement which meets needs. The best would be some sort of redress for economic imbalance.”

    ‘Redress for economic imbalance’ doesn’t have quite the same ring to it as ‘half the assets please’, but Stowe – who was part of the advisory panel that actually suggested the idea to Sir James – does add that new laws could still be incredibly beneficial.

  • Reasons not to Cohabit with your boyfriend (mojiakubudel.com)
    In the early 1970s when I moved in with my boyfriend, there were only 520,000 cohabiting couples in the U.S. Today there are almost 4.75 million. Today, more than half of all couples cohabit prior to marriage, making cohabitation the most common way couples in America begin life together.
    +
    The dramatic increase in cohabitation means that women today face even more pressure to move in with their boyfriend than I did. Yet research shows that living together does not help people prepare for marriage nor does it help them avoid divorce. Cohabitation has come under the intense scrutiny of social scientists in the last three decades because the shift from scandalous thirty years ago to widely accepted today occurred so rapidly.
  • Cohabitation Agreements Taking Place of Prenups for Unwed (blogs.lawyers.com)
    Living together before tying the knot is not the scandalous prospect it was considered to be in more conservative times, and adults in the U.S. are now putting off marriage at unprecedented rates. With the stigma of “shacking up” diminished, more couples are finding reasons to move in together before marriage, prompting some to lay down a few ground rules with cohabitation agreements.Similar to prenuptial agreements, cohabitation agreements are premarital contracts that are used to specify ownership of assets, define living arrangements and establish a variety of other legally-binding terms. For two unmarried partners who split up after several years of living together and making major joint purchases, a cohabitation agreement can make it fairer, cheaper and less complicated for them to separate their lives.
  • Best predictor of divorce? Age when couples cohabit, study says. (debatepolitics.com)
    “Up until now, we’ve had this mysterious finding that cohabitation causes divorce,” she says. “Nobody’s been able to explain it. And now we have – it was that people were measuring it the wrong way.”
    Couples who begin living together without being married tend to be younger than those who move in after the wedding ceremony – that’s why cohabitation seemed to predict divorce, Professor Kuperburg explains. But once researchers control for that age variable, it turns out that premarital cohabitation by itself has little impact on a relationship’s longevity. Those who began living together, unmarried or married, before the age of 23 were the most likely to later split.
    “Part of it is maturity, part of it is picking the right partner, part of it is that you’re really not set up in the world yet,” she says. “And age has to do with economics.”
  • Does cohabitation lead to more divorces? (psychologytoday.com)
    Premarital cohabitation has increased significantly, and more than 70% of US couples now cohabit before marriage. The major reason supporting premarital cohabitation is that it enables the couple to get know each better and to see whether they get along well enough to embark on marriage. However, counter-intuitively, many studies have found that premarital cohabitation is associated with increased risk of divorce, a lower quality of marriage, poorer marital communication, and higher levels of domestic violence. But there are also studies (although less in number) that refute the negative correlation between premarital cohabitation and divorces.
  • Roommate Romance: Why You Should Have a Cohabitation Agreement (herstontennesseefamilylaw.com)
    Couples who cohabitate face many of the same big decisions that confront married couples, like whose couch they should keep, what color to paint the kitchen, or who pays what bills. While people fondly refer to cohabitation as “playing house” with couples often comporting themselves like their married counterparts, non-married cohabitants do not enjoy the same legal protections afforded married couples. Since cohabitants essentially merge their lives, money, assets, and property, it can be difficult to figure out who gets what if the couple calls it quits. The lack of any legal protection or guidance on the distribution of property after cohabitants break up is why you should have a cohabitation agreement.
  • Britain’s vanishing stepfamilies (telegraph.co.uk)

    From Cinderella to Snow White the figure of the stepmother or stepfather is as old as the family itself.

    But new official figures show a dramatic decline in the number of British households in which people are bringing up children from their partner’s previous relationships in the last 10 years.

    According to the Office for National Statistics the number of stepfamilies – a category which includes both married and unmarried parents – plunged by14 per cent in the decade up to the 2011 census.

    The number of such families in England and Wales dropped from 631,000 in 2001 to just 544,000 in 2011.

    Over the same period – which saw a soaring birth rate – the total number of families with dependent children rose by 150,000 to 4.3 million.

Enhanced by Zemanta+++

Ezerwoman's Blog

older couple on beach What is marriage?

When do we stop mentoring the truth about marriage?

I submit for your consideration a strange phenomenon.  An increasing number of older men and women are moving in together.  But, it appears to me that their rationale is fear-based.  Perhaps their spouse has died.  They don’t want to be alone.  Financially, it seems practical not to marry and, instead, live together.  Perhaps it seems less complicated to keep their business affairs separate for the sake of their children and grandchildren.  Perhaps insurance coverage or a life-savings will be better protected if they just cohabitate.  After all, it isn’t so much about sex as it is companionship and being a couple in a “couple’s world.”

So, what is a cohabitating senior, especially a cohabitating Christian senior, saying about marriage?

Is marriage all about the joys of pro-creational sex?  Or is it more?

Marriage, from a Biblical worldview, is…

View original post 359 more words

Advertisements

One thought on “Cohabitating Seniors and the Meaning of Marriage

  1. Pingback: End Times Prophecy Headlines: May 12, 2014 | End Times Prophecy Report

You are welcome to react - U bent welkom om een reactie te geven

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s